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Author Topic:   break in and priming
dode
Member
posted April 11, 2003 09:43 AM
Ok...a few questions...I assembled the new motor and set the valves. I used plenty of cam lube and everything, so it should be fine. Now my question is that if I prime the oil system up good, isn't that going to wash off most of the cam lube? Just something I was thinking about last night. We have already missed the first night, I would rather not miss any more.

John

Flatlander
Member
posted April 11, 2003 01:28 PM
There is no pressure fed oil to the cam lobes so the only oil it would get on it would be whatever drains back from the lifter valley or what leaks by the edge of the lifters. So it is not like a bearing that gets pressrue fed with oil and have the lube washed away.

If youare worried about it add either a can of GM EOS or any of the cam companies break inlube to help guard against flattening a lobe.

dode
Member
posted April 11, 2003 02:02 PM
GM EOS or breakin lube for the oil? What is that? I shouldn't have too much problem should I? I am running a hydraulic cam with 115 lbs of seat pressure.

John

towmandan
Member
posted April 11, 2003 02:04 PM
Go ahead and prime your engine install dist. make sure you got everything else ready and I always spin mine over with the kill switch off until I have oil pressure then flip the switch and you know the rest follow cam break in procedures....towman


istock59
Member
posted April 11, 2003 02:27 PM
GM EOS (Engine Oil Supplement). You can get it at most any GM parts counter. If I'm running a real aggressive cam profile (like Camcraft's) I'll dump a bottle of EOS in during priming/break-in. I think it's mostly a zinc additive, since most oil companies have removed most of it from their oil blends...



dirtbuster
Member
posted April 11, 2003 02:29 PM
EOS=Engine Oil Supplement. Just an oil additive that helps protect the cam and lifters during break in. I think comp has Pro Cam lube or something like that as well as Crane. You should be okay, but if you wanted to add one of these its extra protection.

Just prime your pump, set distributor, and fire then run above 2000 for breakin. I would be careful spinning the engine over a lot without firing it in fear of wiping the lube off the cam and then not having enough to protect it when it does fire.

dode
Member
posted April 11, 2003 02:37 PM
Just so I know, what should one do if for some reason the engine won't fire, like doesn't pull fuel or something like that. Do you have to pull the cam out to reapply the cam lube? That would SUCK. Also, setting valves and spinning it over a few times shouldn't cause any problems should it? I am just learning new stuff all the time...one of these days I won't have to ask so many questions. I am just a little paranoid about stuff sometimes. Comes with being an engineer I guess...

John

istock59
Member
posted April 11, 2003 03:04 PM
Fill the carb with fuel, using the wife's turkey baster.

That way there's no excessive cranking.

I also crack a fitting at the fuel pump, and apply a LITTLE air pressure to the vent line on the fuel cell, to prime the fuel line.



nvracer
Member
posted April 11, 2003 03:11 PM
A few things to do before you even crank the motor. Fill the carb with fuel, prime the fuel system, verify that you have power to the ignition system. Double check that the distr. is in correctly. The motor should fire right up, if it doesn't find out why. Follow the break in procedure of the cam maker. Good luck.


dirtbuster
Member
posted April 11, 2003 03:18 PM
Try to get everything ready to go before hand. Try to get the fuel line from the tank to the pump full,(even fill the line from the carb to the pump if you want), prime the carb, set timing close, dont forget to plug in the distributor, etc. so it fires right away.

I wouldnt worry about setting the valves. Its the constant prolonged spinning that is going to cause cam problems(not to mention hard on the starter). I personally would not do any more cranking on it than I had to. I have heard of some people spinning the motor over with the starter to prime it instead of using a priming tool. I would definetly not do this. I personally cant tell you how much is too much as I have never had any problems, but have heard many horror stories from those that have. If you do end up cranking and cranking on it over and over and it doesnt fire (say close to a minute of combined cranking time or so) then you might want to consider relubing the cam to be safe.



rico 08
Member
posted April 11, 2003 05:08 PM
The only thing i'll add is make sure you run it up to at least 1500 rpm for about 10-15 minutes to break in the cam,get a water hose ready to keep it cool and plenty of fuel etc.make sure if you do have to kill the motor to fix something that when you re-fire it you bring it back up to rpm and finish the break in.


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