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Author Topic:   3.5625 or 3.625 stroke
dirtbuster
Member
posted March 28, 2003 10:11 AM
Has anyone ever built a 3.5625 or 3.625 stroke motor using a 350 block?

If so how did it work? compare to a 383 or 377.

Have been thinking about doing this would like to have a little more motor than a 350 but dont need a 406 and thought maybe it would save us from having to do the clearance work to make a 3.75 stroke fit for a 383.



rico 08
Member
posted March 28, 2003 11:16 AM
The 3.625 motor(commonly called a 3 9/16 stroker)is a very good motor,and also makes a really sneaky cheater motor too,i had one with carillo rods and J&E pistons that went thru 5 blocks and i beleive is still running today.Never heard of the 3.5625 but sounds similar to the cranks new 5.3 and other motors GM is coming out with now.


dirtbuster
Member
posted March 28, 2003 12:02 PM
Did you run the 3.625 in a 350 or 400 block?
I assume 350.

What length rod did you use and was it a special piston or a stock piston?

That seems odd that a crank with 3 5/8" stroke is known as a 3 9/16" stroker.

stockcar5
Member
posted March 28, 2003 12:25 PM
i believe its called a 9/16th motor cause your adding 9/16th to the stroke of a 350. this crank works well in a 400 block to make a 393 (i believe) much smoother power than a 406.

luke

sdhnc29
Member
posted March 28, 2003 05:00 PM
The 3.562"(3-9/16) and the 3.625"(3-5/8) were both very common in 350 type block's several year's ago . We built a ton of them in California . In our personal house car at the time , we had to meet a 363ci rule . I had two different engines , one was a 3.625"x3.990" bore , and the other was a 3.550"x4.030" engine . Personally , I liked the 3.550" engine better . We used a 6.200" rod in the 3.550" engine vs. a 6" rod in the 5/8" engine . The 3.550" engine seamed to pull hard off the corner , and on into the next turn , were as the 5/8" combo would pull like h@ll up off the corner , and then fall a little flat top end . In both engines we used bowtie block's , and in this case there was some clearance work to be done . It's most common to find the 3-9/16 and 3-5/8" crank's that are running today , in big bore combo's (4.125" and up). If you are not working around a cubic inch rule , and want to build a strong running engine , then I'd try the big bore combo with either of these crank's . In most every case , you will need a custom piston .

Steve

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Hendren Racing Engines
Rutherfordton , NC
(828)286-0780


dirtbuster
Member
posted March 31, 2003 09:27 AM
thanks Steve

so do you think it would be better in the long run to stick with the common 355,377,383 406? instead of the off combos.



dirtrace54
Member
posted March 31, 2003 12:24 PM
This is some very helpful info on these motors. Thankx


Chad
Member
posted March 31, 2003 12:59 PM
I want to echo Steve's comments. I have run a 3.625" stroke with a stock 350 block and it was the best motor I ever had. Ran with a 6" rod and flat top pistons, and 4.030 on the bore. The power was very driveable and pulled real hard. I have a 406 now, and still feel the 3.625 was a better motor. The cranks are a little pricey. I have been looking for one to replace my broken crank, but have been reluctant to spend $800-$950 on a IMCA claimer crank. You won't go wrong if you put one together. Ask the old timers, they know this combo and how good it works.


The Rascal
Member
posted March 31, 2003 05:59 PM
Our “magic” numbers are 1.75 rod/stroke & 1.12-1.14 bore/stroke for very forgiving & driveable power curves…but then again our stuff starts our really close to that…Rascal

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"blessed mother of acceleration don't fail us now!" Elwood Blues


sdhnc29
Member
posted March 31, 2003 08:59 PM
Yes , without getting into expensive crank's and custom piston's , I like the 377ci combo . A few year's back , when 3.550" ,3.562" , and 3.625" crank's were common shelf stock item's for most of the crank manufacture's , these were relatively quick and easy combo's to put together . If you have the time to wait for a crank to be built , and pistons to be made , then I'd try one of these combo's . I know you'd like them ! But if your looking to get something together fast , then the 377ci is a quick , easy , and time tested combo to go with .

Hope this helps,
Steve

------------------
Hendren Racing Engines
Rutherfordton , NC
(828)286-0780


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