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Author Topic:   Monoleaf/coil set up question
DavidC
Member
posted March 15, 2004 09:00 PM

On a monoleaf/coil set up When changing the leaf spring to a 55 lb/in from a 35 should I also go to a lighter coil spring to keep the same spring rate?


Ego Racing
Member
posted March 16, 2004 11:48 AM
What spring are you running now? Are the monos angled in or mounted straight oto the chassis? What is the total weight of your car?


DavidC
Member
posted March 16, 2004 03:43 PM
quote:
Originally posted by DavidC:

On a monoleaf/coil set up When changing the leaf spring to a 55 lb/in from a 35 should I also go to a lighter coil spring to keep the same spring rate?

The car weight is 2350. The RR spring 150
The LR spring 175. The springs do toe out to the rear. 41" in front 441/2" at the rear.


Ego Racing
Member
posted March 16, 2004 05:23 PM
With the springs angled in in the front it is going to use more of the leaf spring as a spring but with the springs you are using now it should be OK. May I ask Why the heavier spring rate leafs?


DavidC
Member
posted March 16, 2004 07:54 PM
The light springs distort and twist. I can see the springs are bent and the rear end is off center, pushed to the left. My thinking is that the light springs allow way too much lateral movement in the turns.
Also, the previous owner said the car performed better with the heavier springs.


Ego Racing
Member
posted March 17, 2004 03:55 PM
I have found that the mono leafs come in a few thicknesses. Some are as thim as 1/4 inch. If you can try to find a good spring that is about .390 inches thick. These are in different rates so you can taylor the spring to the car.
Mono leafs are designed to be used as a locating link like a trailing arm. With the spring angled in at the front it is being twisted as well as compressed and will wear out quicker. We changed them at least once a year when ours were mounted straight. I have heard of people replacing them 3 times a season.
Here is a tip for measuring the arch on them: Lay the new spring on it's side on a peice of plywood and mark the outline on the wood. Cut two peices to match the arch. Now put 1 or 2 2X6's between the plywood and glue together with alot of liquid nails and screws. Now cut the arch of the plywood aout of the 2x6's and you have a template of your spring. When you need to check your spring unbolt one end from the chassis and from the rearend and hold the template up to it. No Guessing if it is twisted or dearched.


MOD75D
Member
posted March 17, 2004 08:28 PM
I ran a mono leaf car last year and found out that the 35lb springs were better because it alowed the rearend to wrap. If you use the stifer springs it will shock the tires more and cause you to loose forward bite. It is well worth the money to replace the 35's twice a year. But thats just my opinon and how my car reacted.


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