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Author Topic:   has anyone done this?
Xtrem4U
Member
posted December 21, 2003 07:21 AM
if you ran a 5.83, i would start the season with a 6.00 or maybe a 6.20. i hope it's a "long rod" 406......if it isn't, get your cherry picker dusted off...


Xtrem4U
Member
posted December 22, 2003 05:04 AM
Yes- it's a good long rod 406. But wouldn't you go the other way on gears?


Xtrem4U
Member
posted December 22, 2003 05:06 AM
Yes- it's a good long rod 406. But wouldn't you go the other way on gears?


lucky13
Member
posted December 22, 2003 06:22 AM
Most rollers help the top end out more than the bottom. Solid cams are limited by lobe design and friction, so they will usually run close to a roller until you turn up the revs. If you plan to not run higher RPM's, the gain from switching to a roller will be smaller, and you may consider keeping the solid. Don't get me wrong, I love roller cams ( that is why man invented the wheel, right?) and think they are superior, but you also have to weigh the options. Roller stuff is harder on valve guides, timing chains, etc... and you should run good quality valves with the added seat pressure. Also, you should run a decent set of roller rockers, or they will break due to the spring pressure. Then there is also valve to piston clearance to take into account. You may have to cut your valve reliefs in deeper, or buy different pistons. Don't forget the broze distributor gear and a cam retainer of some sort (button or whatever). This is a lot of work to do if you don't plan on using to to its potential.

On your original question, it still depends on what grind of roller you have vs. the solid as far as gearing goes. For example, if you had a huge solid cam and switch to a comparable sized (mid sized) roller, you might end up leaving the gearing the same, just running a couple hundred more revs.

Good luck!

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