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Author Topic:   springs should they hold car up
rockit
Member
posted June 09, 2003 04:04 PM
should the 4 springs total the weight of the car ? like a 2200 car and the srping total 1900 when add together .that would not be enought spring in the car .or should the springs add up 2200. thanks rockit


devil wrench
Member
posted June 09, 2003 04:34 PM
????

No, otherwise our LM would only weigh 1125.

dirtbuster
Member
posted June 09, 2003 05:23 PM
No the spring rate is per inch of travel, not total capacity. For instance a 500# load will depress a 250# srping approximately 2". Or a 100# spring 5". Each spring is carrying 500# total but one compresses more than the other.

If you had springs that totaled the cars weight they would only compress 1" and would be very stiff because it would take that much weight again to compress them another inch or fraction therof.

dluna
Member
posted June 09, 2003 06:09 PM
What should be the max number of inches you would want a spring to be compressed at ride height before you need to switch that spring out with a stiffer one? For example: We run 13" rear springs and the LR spring measures 10 1/4" and RR measures 9 3/4" at ride height.

Thanks.

dluna
Member
posted June 12, 2003 02:21 PM
anybody?


rocket36
Member
posted June 13, 2003 04:43 AM
as far as i'm aware, the springs free length is of no real importance. there was an article in a magazine (can't remember - circle track, stock car, speedway illustrated), but it had a test with billy moyer and another top LM driver where they tested lots of different things (including spring length) and used on board telemetry to analise results. they found that as long as the spring was the same rate, there is no difference in changing length).
as far as going to a stiffer spring, we usually check our travel indicators on the shocks. if they are close to bottoming out then the spring probably needs to be stiffer.
ride hieght is only concerned with correct suspension geometry and wheel alignment.


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