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Author Topic:   Ride Heights
Okie11m
Member
posted January 25, 2004 05:16 PM
3/8 med bank running 1150rf 950lf 250rr 300lr. 3200# mid 70s Monte. What is a good starting point for frame hieghts. Thanks in advance.


Okie11m
Member
posted January 27, 2004 04:17 PM
Was it a dumb Q. or what???????????????


nate 11
Member
posted January 27, 2004 04:20 PM
dont sound like a dumb question to me. i just dont know the answer. you might run a search and find somthing. hope this helps......later


nwdirtmod2
Member
posted January 27, 2004 09:50 PM
Just make sure you have plenty of suspension travel. You don't want is to bottom out in the corners. Check clearance between frame and lower control arm.


77k
Member
posted January 28, 2004 11:46 PM
what track are you running and what is your tire rule?


Okie11m
Member
posted January 29, 2004 12:04 AM
3/8 track med bank, & IMCA G-60. Any info would help. I have had some handling problems & someone asked me about ride height. I went to the shop & checked it and told the guy & he laughed. So I thought I would ask you guys.


77k
Member
posted January 29, 2004 09:30 PM
outlaw speedway or enid?


Ego Racing
Member
posted January 30, 2004 10:13 AM
stocks are generaly 6-8 inches on dirt. If the track is smother use less, rougher use more. Get it as low as possable without bottoming out. Was the person you asked and older race driver? I have known some loder drivers that have built there own chassis that never put the car on scales they figured long ago what made it fast and only use a tape measure for setup now, They work on the car set the ride height and go win races.


Okie11m
Member
posted January 30, 2004 11:24 AM
77k I race at Jetmore,KS & Elk City. My heights are lf 6 rf 8 rr 7 lr 6 1/2. So I'm in the 6-8 range? Thanks guys.


racer038
Member
posted January 30, 2004 02:28 PM
In the past, we've initally set up cars with the RF and LR at the same height, the LF 1" less and the RR 1" more. On numerous cars, this has resulted in a 49% - 51% crossweight. We start here with ride heights using 100# split in front springs and 50# split at the rear. This works when racing unfamiliar cars, helping another driver get a baseline and driving unfamiliar tracks.


77k
Member
posted January 30, 2004 06:26 PM
been to elk city but never raced there.I like about 150 split on front,1000 lf 1150 rf.175 lr 200 rr or 200/225. My cars are about #3400. hight lf 6 1/2 rf 7 1/4 lr 7 1/4 rr 8,then put 1 1/8 socket or so on your jack and center under rearend.Jack up until tires clear ground, try to get rr to come off ground 1/4 inch first.that will put you in ball park. Shocks and where you got your lead can make a big differance.I run n.e. ok and caney kans.


Eljojo
Member
posted January 30, 2004 06:55 PM
posted August 10, 2003 01:37 AM
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I'm a nut about ride heights and making chassis work. I've posted several times about ride heights. Rico 08 gave you some numbers, which I feel sure work for him, but will they work for you? Are you using the same springs, tires, and ball joints that he is? If so...take his numbers and run with them. But if not you may want to take the time to set your car up. It's a little time consuming, but will be worth every bit of the effort!
Start with the car full of fuel and put your weight in the drivers seat. Set your air pressures. Now take a look at your front lower a frames. You'll want the lower ball joint on the left side just a tick higher than the connection to the frame. Move to the right side and set it (the lower a-arm) level. measure the frame heights at the kick out. The right should be ABOUT an inch higher than the left. Now set your left rear at or above the measurement that you took on your right front. Jack the right side up an inch more than that.
Now! Look at the lower rear trailing arms. If they are running downhill to the front what do you think will happen when you get into the throttle? The car will squat in the rear. If the rear end squats, Sir Issac Newton had the dumb idea that every action creates an equal and opposite reaction. So if the back of the car is pushed down, which direction do you think the tires are wanting to go......UP! Loss of traction. The lower rear trailing arms MUST be angled upwards to lift the weight of the car--forcing the rear wheels down into the dirt.
Pinion angle aint jack! It's how you get that pinion angle! If your lower arms are lengthened, you will produce downward pinion angle. But as you lengthen the lower arm, the angle of the arm reduces (due to the lengthening of the arc it makes under accleration) So either you raise the ride height or shorten the top arm.(which changes the arc that it makes under acceleration.)
Under a best case scenario you would want the lower arms to push the body up and the upper arms to pull the body up.
Do the work nessecary to achieve ride heights in relation to lower front a arms and the four links you have in the rear. You'll soon see that by relocating the mounting points and altering the arm lengths that your car will not have drastic caster and camber changes in the front suspension, and will have more forward bite in the rear suspension.
Don't you wish I'd have said 6, 7, 8, and 9?
Good luck! Don't become discouraged, good set ups take work!


ss38k
Member
posted January 30, 2004 08:37 PM
hello eljojo was reading your reply just was wondering. about the angles on the lower trailing arms. and upper's.what is your thought.thanks. race on


Eljojo
Member
posted January 31, 2004 05:35 PM
I haven't a clue! That happens when you get old. If I find that notebook I'll post.


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