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Author Topic:   Stagger!!!
martnracn_91
Member
posted April 28, 2003 12:20 AM
I was wondering if someone could tell me if 3in. of stagger is ok for a 1/3 mile high bank.


Gene
Member
posted April 28, 2003 02:46 AM
Sounds in the ballpark.


racer2
Member
posted April 28, 2003 08:05 AM
a good place to start


odb93
Member
posted April 28, 2003 09:08 AM
odb93, are you sure you don't have that backwards. i would think that the tighter the turn radius the more stagger, and vice versa (with a locked rearend of course). if i'm missing something here let me know.

martnracn_91, that sounds like a good place to start. remember, the more stagger you run the more it hurts you down the straight.

justin

odb93
Member
posted April 29, 2003 01:31 PM
93 have you tried that ? i know for a fact last week i ran a new track that had tighter turns and higher bank then i normally run and i ran the same set up i always do in the heat and it pushed like a big dog so i thru some stagger to it and was a whole new car come off the corner like a rocket. it's just like harry told cole loose is fast and on the edge or out of control lol


justin
Member
posted April 29, 2003 09:57 PM
odb93, on a tight turn race track i would rather be on the looser side, especially with a lot of cars out there. but that's just my preference. i still don't understand why run less stagger on a tighter turn track. if you were to take 2 solid rear ends with different amounts of stagger (ex. 2" and 4"), the 4" staggered rear end will turn a smaller circle (smaller radius) than the 2". that is why i would think that a tighter turn radius would theoretically need more stagger. i'm not saying you or dale mcdowell is wrong by any means. i'll be the first one to admit that my setup ability doesn't compare to dale's or his brothers (who sets up his cars). personally, i like a car to have as little stagger as possible and still be neutral thru the corners. maybe someone else can help us out on this .



odb93
Member
posted May 01, 2003 04:00 PM
SOoo, What if you put stagger in the front only? "checker or wrecker"


jnewman44
Member
posted May 01, 2003 11:07 PM
Go to circletrack.com and look under the tech articles for info on stagger, they have a chart that you enter your track banking in degrees and the corner distance (or radius) and it tells you what you want.


jammin
Administrator
posted May 02, 2003 12:19 AM
I did one better! Check out the toolbox, I built a calculator to do it for you!

jammin


rico 08
Member
posted May 02, 2003 08:44 AM
Tighter turn more stagger,not to step on you're toes but Dale Mcdowell runs latemodels and they are not compareable in setup to stock frame type racecars,especially with the three legged dog setups they run nowdays.MARTIN be careful not to run too much stagger if it's a metric,they prefer little amounts of stagger,camaro's like more.IMHO


martnracn_91
Member
posted May 02, 2003 09:36 AM
Hey Rico, would 3in. be to much stagger for a metric?


The Big Dawg
Member
posted May 02, 2003 10:27 AM
hey,Martin I run a 91" tire on rr, and a 88" tire on lr,gives me exactly 3" of stagger,and the car works pretty **** good.So you would have a good starting point.And Justin I would agree with you on the tighter the turn the looser you want the car ,and wider the corner the tighter the car.


odb93
Member
posted May 02, 2003 01:04 PM
Are u counter steering that motor cycle. Please explain your theory. I know all the motor cycles that i have ridden that when you take a right hand turn you move the handle bars to the right also.


odb93
Member
posted May 06, 2003 10:17 AM
I know we are getting off of the subject of auto racing, but the only way you can steer a motorcycle into the turn (i.e. right turn, turn bars right) is if you are going extremely slow. Motorcycles become more stable the faster you go, because the tires produce a gyroscopic effect. The faster a motorcycle tire turns, the more it wants to remain upright and travel straight. Since the tires have this gyroscopic effect, when you want to turn you need to induce precession. To accomplish this you turn the bars slightly away from the direction you want to turn and the wheel's axis of rotation will turn in the direction you want to go. Since you are moving the axis of the wheel it will lean in the direction you want to go. When you are going at very slow speeds the gyroscopic effect is very small and you can turn the bars the direction you want to go. Most of this happens naturally and you may not even notice that you are moving the bars in the opposite direction than you are turning, but you are. Also most people make the mistake of letting off the throttle when thy are leaned over too far and need to straighten the bike up. If you need to straighten the bike up you need to give it more gas, keep the bars straight and the bike will straighten right up.


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