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Author Topic:   Disappointing scale numbers
tilley88
Member
posted November 26, 2002 12:09 AM
'99 Shaw copy, '68-'72 Chevelle clip;

200 lb. driver/ 20 gal. race fuel
2590 total

Left-54.8%
Rear-55.8%
Cross-49.8%
Left bite-120 lbs.

Does my left seem high? Rear low? First mod, need help.

HarrisMod#30
Member
posted November 26, 2002 07:22 AM
Forgot to mention it's a 2-link w/ pullbar. Got weight jackers w/ springs on top. Would love to get as much rear as possible.lol.


jklostermann
Member
posted November 26, 2002 12:54 PM
Jeff,

Your rear precent isn't where it's all at. However it wouldn't hurt to bring it up to about 58-59% to start with, play with it as you get some seat time to make it work the best for you. As far as your cross goes, I'm not sure what size track your running on or how much stagger you have in the rear but it seems to me your car is going to be pretty loose on entry. Of course you may like that type of setup, it's all about how to make the car work for you not how you can work for the car.

modman97
Member
posted November 26, 2002 03:34 PM
I think the guys are giving you some descent #s to shoot for.
First, I would make real sure your floor is level. Secondly , make sure the scales are calibrated accurately. These 2 are paramount! If your left front tire is in a low spot...problem solved.
If there are no binds in the suspension, your probably going to have to move some weight around a bunch. For instance, a bigger cell (32gal.)could give you another 70lbs. toward the rear. Keep pluggin away!


tilley88
Member
posted November 26, 2002 05:06 PM
I tried out my brand new scales for the first time last nite. The floor may have not been exactly level, but close. I'll solve that problem with vinyl tiles or make pad levelers. I put 200 lbs. of lead in the seat to simulate my weight, and 145 lbs on and around my empty fuel cell to simulate 20 gal. of fuel. I've got a 32 gal. cell. No other hangin weight on the car. After all other adjustments have been made, and binds removed, how much weight is too much to get these numbers?


2nd2none
Member
posted November 26, 2002 05:08 PM
getting the rear percent up to atleast 57-58% is a must even if it means to add 100# of lead being a little bit heavy and hooking up hard is alot better then not being able to hook up and spin tires all way down straights. Also knocking off 2% of leftside weight will make a big handling difference, it'll give you more sidebite getting into the corner because as the car wants to roll over on the right there is less weight that it has to "pick" up.

if you're car already weights 2600lbs i'd start looking on the frontend for things to lighten up to help the rear out. Where's the battery box located? Move it farther to the back and to the right side could help. Measure the engine set back from motor plate back to axle tube...this should be no less than 72" if its greater than 72" move the motor back. I also always scale my car full of fuel so i know exactly how much rear% i have.

[This message has been edited by 2nd2none (edited November 26, 2002).]

HarrisMod#30
Member
posted November 27, 2002 07:06 AM
disregard most of my last post, i forgot you had 200# of lead in the seat which would make the car about 2400.....still could use a diet....thats about how much it should weigh with a full 32 gal cell.


tilley88
Member
posted November 27, 2002 09:06 PM
Yeah, it's 120 lbs. over where I want to be. Why scale a car without driver weight? I don't know of anybody running without a driver. It seems numbers will change alot between a 150 lb. driver and a 300 lb. driver. I did weigh the car without lead in the seat, and the numbers were much different. Total was 2390, left 52.4, rear 57.3, cross 50.8, left bite 72 lbs. This was with 20 gal of fuel. And yes, the car is going on a diet(me too). I hope to trim 100 lbs off by race season. One question; will raising my ride height in front and lowering it in the rear change any numbers?


HarrisMod#30
Member
posted November 27, 2002 09:32 PM
Scaling your car will not make it fast. hte idea with the first scale is to get it close. Run it at the track, make adjustments and get it to where you like it. Now scale it again and right down those numbers. If you ever get in a crash and need to replace parts, you have your numbers. If you change springs or anything else, you have your numbers. People make big mistakes in setting up their cars on scales and thinking it is race ready. It is just a starting point. I only scale my car when I change something and when I stuff it in the wall

My reason for sharing this is to your comment of scaling with the driver or lead in the seat. It doesn't matter...as long as you do it the same way every time.

BTW, most people get that 52 Left side with out the driver. If you yank the weight I bet your right on.

HarrisMod#30
Member
posted November 28, 2002 09:33 AM
Call me what you want;

We scale without the driver after we find a happy spot with the driver. It takes a while to do but is easier in the long run.

Scale the car with driver.(log info.)
Then scale car without driver.(log info.)

Then the driver need not be present during a scaling session and you don't need to wrestle all that lead. Too darn much work.

Jim


tilley88
Member
posted November 28, 2002 10:38 AM
That would be helpful seeing that I'm the driver. But for now, I've got to substitute lead in place of my leada$$.lol. Just hunting for good starting numbers so I can scale later without driver's weight. I've never done it that way(w/o driver) so it's kinda confusing.


dirtracer14
Member
posted November 28, 2002 10:58 AM
I have found in the past that using lead as fuel and driver dont work to well(for me). I have put lead around the cell to make up for fuel and checked it with the fuel and the #s were off pretty bad, same with the driver. I dont know if anyone else has tried this but it didnt work well for getting wheel weights as close as they should be. I also scale without driver make changes then when im done i climb in and write down what i get with driver just for refrance. I also found when you do scale make sure its the same spot on the floor or the #s will be diff every time no matter if you changed a thing. I dont like to level all the scales so when i first scale the car on my certain spot on the floor as long as i allways use the same spot i will know were my car is.

Happy T-Day

tilley88
Member
posted November 28, 2002 11:09 AM
I really appreciate all the replies. This is by far my favorite website!
After reading these replies I've decided to re-scale correctly, without driver, but with 20 gal.fuel. I'll level the scales, reset my ride heights, and check for binds. Hopefully we'll see better results! Then later this winter, after a crash diet, I'll check again. This stuff sure makes for interesting conversation!


66jj
Member
posted November 28, 2002 01:01 PM
I HAVE SCALED MY CAR WITH LEADIN THE SEAT THEN REMOVED IT AND GOT IN, AND CHECKED THE #S SEEMED TO LOSE 1/4 OF A PERCENT OF REAR, GUESS MY LEGS AND FEET WEIGH A LOT, IM ONLY 170# ALSO SO IF YOUR BIGGER IT WILL MATTER..


JEFF


Racer14K
Member
posted November 29, 2002 01:24 PM
What about shocks, I have heard both ways that they should be mounted and unmounted.


tilley88
Member
posted November 29, 2002 01:55 PM
I believe if you bounce the car before taking numbers it should be O.K.. But, if your numbers are steadily climbing or declining after the initial read then maybe you should take the shocks loose or look for binds.


dirtracer14
Member
posted November 29, 2002 05:21 PM
If i unhook the shocks first time then i will allways scale with them unhooked but if i scale with em on i allways leave em on....if they are on i do bounce the car. I hope this made sence... basically which ever way you do it allways do it that way!!


HarrisMod#30
Member
posted November 29, 2002 10:49 PM
Un-Hook, big difference unless you let the car settle for about 10 minutes when they are connected.