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Author Topic:   Plastic Brake Lines
Mudrat454
Member
posted December 27, 2001 11:55 PM
How many people run plastic brake lines? Are they IMCA legal? How often should they be replaced? We bought a mod with them on it and I am wondering if they are safe?


Gene
Member
posted December 28, 2001 04:50 AM
Put steel lines on it. Whats it cost,15 bucks? And you'll never have to worry about weld splatter, cold, or a rock leaving you breakless.


2nd2none
Member
posted December 28, 2001 12:16 PM
i switched to plastic for next season, hope i dont regret it


G17RACING
Member
posted December 28, 2001 12:52 PM
I HAB THEM ALL SEASON AND HAVEN'T HAD ANY PROBLEMS (KNOCK ON WOOD). AS OF RIGHT NOW I WOULDN'T HAVE ANYTHING ELSE! EASY TO INSTALL AND YOU SAY A FEW POUNDS


G17RACING
Member
posted December 28, 2001 12:57 PM
SORRY, I MEANT TO PUT A THUMBS UP ON THE LAST POST!
YES, THEY ARE IMCA LEGAL!


IMCAMOD17
Member
posted December 28, 2001 06:09 PM
We use plastic on our mod and it hasn't broke but we desided that if any brake line gets hit hard enough to rip plastic it would brake anything so it would be ok


ford5
Member
posted December 28, 2001 07:44 PM
Yes you can use them on hydraulic clutch line did it here, works great!


2nd2none
Member
posted December 28, 2001 11:53 PM
what i did in the areas where i thought where vulnerable to mud and rocks was wrap the plastic line with rubber hose


Rooster
Member
posted December 29, 2001 10:00 PM
Love the plastic, only had one problem, I was straightening a frame horn and hit one with a torch. I've run them for three years, don't want to go back. I'll stay with the plastic.


IMCAMOD17
Member
posted December 29, 2001 11:17 PM
We have some washers welded to the frame and mount the caliper lines there, we run the plastic into them at that point. Everywhere else we us the plastic wire ties.


tmtrigg4
Member
posted December 30, 2001 09:23 AM
used plastic on my mod for the last 7 years. never a problem. used on go karts for last 30 years


devil wrench
Member
posted January 01, 2002 12:44 PM
tmtrigg....I REALLY HOPE YOU'RE NOT DRILLING INTO THE TUBING TO RIVET THOSE CLAMPS!!!!!


hotwheelz
Member
posted January 03, 2002 10:19 PM
we run plastic, we use vaccum hose to insulate areas that might rub or pinch, zip ties hold the lines in place..also use it on the clutch, the burst rate is really high and ok, just don't over tighten at connections...


jonboy
Member
posted January 05, 2002 02:37 AM
They seem to work ok and install a lot quicker but I've seen them swell under hard braking causing more pedal travel. This occured in the summer at about ninety degrees. We were bleeding the brakes because of spongy pedal and you could see the plastic swelling. There may be a shelf life issue or different qualities of the plastic lines. Who knows maybe they gave us swamp cooler plastic lines as they had no bust pressure numbers on them.


Mudrat454
Member
posted January 07, 2002 05:59 PM
Right now my mod has the plastic running all the way to the front calipers, to me this looks like the most vulnerable spot. I think on the back it looks ok but I would like to run flexible steel lines from the front calipers to the frame. My question is what fitting do you use to adapt a -4an to the compression fitting of the brake lines? All the ones I can find go from a -4 to an inverted flare for a steel line! Thanks for any help.

------------------
Sharp Motorsports


racer20
Member
posted January 07, 2002 08:09 PM
Has any one tried plastic on asphalt mod??
my brake pressure is about 900psi on fronts,
didnt know if that is more pressure than dirt? also many times rotors glow red??will they hold up?


nvracer
Member
posted January 07, 2002 08:13 PM
I made a bracket from a sch 40 1/8" coupling. use a 4an to 1/8" NPT on one side and use a 1/8" to plastic tubing fitting. I welded the bracket to the chassis. And use steel braided line to calipers.


dirtbuster
Member
posted February 08, 2002 02:32 PM
I never have and never will run plastic lines on my car. I watched a driver last year blow a motor and a small fire ensued. No big deal except everyone wondered why he didn't stop and get out just kept coasting along. Made it halfway around the track before he got stopped. The fire had melted every brake line he had and he couldn't stop so there he was just coasting and burning and nothing he could do about it. Needless to say there were several drivers change back to steel after that.


NWModracer
Member
posted February 08, 2002 03:30 PM
Or you could just shut it off while it's in gear...use your melon for more than a helmet rack.


blanep
Member
posted February 08, 2002 05:49 PM
I think I agree with the last couple of posts, I mean odd things can and do happen to any type of system you can come up with. For instance, my solenoid cap once broke allowing the positive battery cable end to flop over and hit the metal brake line. This of course caused an arc which quickly put a hole in the brake line, spewing brake fluid all over the hot headers for quite a period of time. I previously hadn't really thought about brake fluid being flammable, but in this instance it was and the resulting fire was a nightmare to get put out since at the time I didn't know what was causing the fire to begin with. Luckily I was already at a stop so getting out of the car wasn't an issue for me. Obviously plastic lines would have probably had a different outcome for me (one without fire in that particular case), so you just never can be safe from all possible hazards regardless of what you do.


jonboy
Member
posted February 10, 2002 04:37 PM
Racer20, I think the plastic lines on any asphalt car is nuts. Any fluid on your tires and you're going for a wild ride. Brake fluid is especially slippery and if nothing else after you crash everybody behind you is gonna run into you. I've seen five cars go straight over the hill on dirt after getting in oil from a blown engine, on asphalt it must be worse. I would think with all the rules such as: overflow tanks for the radiator, even in the lower levels of racing, there is good reason for it. Better check the rules and then use some common sense. You don't want to go straight into a wall. A little caution is better than a lot of regret. Good luck this year.