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Author Topic:   Left Rear Bite (Wedge)
tagteam racing
Member
posted October 16, 2001 12:24 PM
Read your tire temps..they will tell you everything. Try to get them as even as possible on temps and you will be close. This will change from heats to feature time also.

jammin


flyin41
Member
posted October 18, 2001 10:36 PM
My right rear tire is always much warmer than my left tire is so what should I do to correct this?


jammin
Administrator
posted October 18, 2001 10:41 PM
Add cross to the car....your wedge percentage should be higher.


jammin


6x
Member
posted October 27, 2001 10:17 AM
I have just noticed that the closer my temps are that the car handles better, and that we generally are really loose when we have a really hot right rear. As far as a car being free, it is all based on driver preference and how the driver feels the car should be. A tighter car will have more bite, but you still have to be able to turn it. A car can be extremely tight and have too much right rear in it going in that will cause the heat problems you are stating in the rr. This could be the problem that you stated.

jammin

[This message has been edited by jammin (edited October 27, 2001).]

MOD RACER#93
Member
posted October 28, 2001 12:59 PM
Stagger gets you IN,,,Wedge gets you OUT.
and put your bleeder back in. try 1 in stagger.



jammin
Administrator
posted October 28, 2001 08:36 PM
What do you do to your car when you add stagger? Look at your scales....you actually take wedge out of the car. It is more of a weight distribution factor than a travel factor of the tire. That is why a lot of people think reverse stagger helps their car, and in a lot of cases it will because you have just increased the wedge in your car....not so much the travel factor.


jammin

[This message has been edited by jammin (edited October 28, 2001).]

spde
Member
posted October 28, 2001 10:06 PM
I run about 150#'s of wedge on our dry slick track, it has very little bank. also i have about 59.5% rear weight. we run 100% rear brake I dont have a gauge on this car but i never adjust the brakes. i usually start about 1 pound more air in the left side.


wfoondirt
Member
posted October 29, 2001 09:01 AM
I aggree with jammin that adding stagger with all else remaining the same will decrease cross. Reducing cross will tighten a car on entry if the car is slowed mainly with the rear wheels. If you add stagger then add cross back with the weight jacks you will not significatly change entry. Stagger does very little at any point where the wheels are sliding, where stagger will make a difference is in steady state cornering, typically on dirt this is in the middle of the corner. I also aggree that you can't base you adjustments solely on tire temps, like was posted earlier a good driver will compensate for an ill handling car. If a car is too tight on entry the driver will have to "pitch" the car in to compensate for the push, in doing this they will abuse the rr tire and thus show more temp in that tire. So the key to making proper adjustments is to take into consideration driver input and crew observations along with tire temps/shock travel etc.


juniorfan
Member
posted October 29, 2001 06:39 PM
I've run as much as 300# of wedge and been ok.


tls88mod
Member
posted October 29, 2001 09:04 PM
Does anybody watch shock travel?


juniorfan
Member
posted October 29, 2001 09:39 PM
Of course we do, but what does that have to do with wedge?


tls88mod
Member
posted October 29, 2001 09:55 PM
Not a darn thing, just wondering if anybody watches it.


tmtrigg4
Member
posted October 30, 2001 10:26 AM
Something to consider for those taking tire temperatures on dirt: it's often difficult to find dry ground to drive on while returning to the pits and many tracks don't have an area to stop and check. If you run through a muddy area the tires will be cooled, thus giving you a false reading. One track I run waters the pits so much during the night that I don't think you can get an accurate reading, even after the main. I'm not saying it's not worth the effort but beware of the potential problems.

Another good way to keep track of traction is by keeping tire pressure records (although staying away from mud before a reading applies here too). I'd think working toward equal pressure growth is more critical than trying to get all the pressures equal. I used to tune a road racing sedan with equal tire pressures but there you're starting out with pretty even weight distribution and the loads are generally more balanced, what with all the left and right turns. Our dirt car works pretty well and the final pressures don't ever equal. We're running about 150# LR with 12# right side, 8# left side and around 59% rear. Of course, as we get more dialed in, my attitudes on this could change.

tagteam racing
Member
posted October 30, 2001 06:08 PM
With a stop and go track, how much is too much wedge?? On a dry slick track?


tmtrigg4
Member
posted October 30, 2001 10:46 PM
I am not sure that there is a sure fire answer for your question. It boils down to driver preferance and how the car responds. I like alot of wedge because it gives the car natural bite. Some guys don't like a tight car and would throw rocks at the high wedge deal. It can be difficult to drive and takes different thoughts to tune but it is fast if you can get comfortable driving it.
This question in broad terms is like the chicken and the egg deal. You have to find what is best for you and your situation. I don't like to get over 275# of LR, makes the car wheelie bad on a track with bite. Good Luck.


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