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Author Topic:   full frame chassis
racer17j
Member
posted August 30, 2001 01:18 AM
my buddy buoght an older mod chassis that is a full frame metric car bought it as a bare fame and is gonna use it to mess around on the river in the winter. i was thinking about makeing a chassis simular to run in our b mod class. has anybody run this type set up basicly it is an imca stock car chassis with a mod cage on it is it worth tring or would it be a big waste of time and money that would not keep up. the rules are imca with a 360 cid 9-1 comp and 4412 carb and stock tranny set ups.


CUSTOMPERFORMANCE
Member
posted August 30, 2001 08:01 PM
i dont think it would be worth the effort time or money. really a b mod should be built like a a mod so if you want to go run with the a mods after running b mods you will want a car that will be competetive. a full frame car wouldnt be as competetive if you were to run the a mods and cost to do either car really isnt much difference


dirtracer14
Member
posted August 30, 2001 11:52 PM
I have a old wissota car that the frame goes to the top of the rear tires.The lower arms bolt into the stock location of the metric frame. It is a 3 link pullbar car and works very well on 1/4 to 1/2 mile tracks. The car was 2500# with me and 32 gallons. This was in a normal mod class with no motor claim. If you goto the user pics its the red and white #14 with all the hardwear from 1999 on it. Not sure if the frame you got is close to this one...but it can be a competitive car. Again just my 2 cents.


racer17j
Member
posted August 31, 2001 09:10 AM
14 this sounds like about the same thing other than he has the stock mounts on the rear. as for worring about moving up to a mods i realy don't see that in my future well at least for another 18 years anyway lol i was just wanting to try this out and maybe in couple years or so cut it off at the cage and put a different set up on the tail. i can get all the tubing i want sponsored to me thats why i tought i would run the stock stuff for now and get the suspention stuff over time as i can afford it and if all else fails i can alway run with my buddy on the river


bbracer17
Member
posted August 31, 2001 09:08 PM
I know a guy that runs a metric frame car like that and it runs ok. He says it's heavy but it is always a mid pack car.


eagleii
unregistered
posted September 01, 2001 05:43 AM           
I agree with CustomPerformance. To be competitive, you need to have a car that was designed for class you intend to run. I have "remodeled" cars to run a diffrent class than it was designed for and ended up with a "mid packer", also.

As a chassis builder, I have a little diffrent perspective on chassis'. I would rather build a whole new car than to change one or even try to fix moderate damage. Minor damage is fairly simple to fix, but if anything is really bent, I start all over again.

Again, I agree with CustomPerformance, the cost of converting a chassis almost always costs the about same as just getting a new one.

Jerry

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EagleII


racer17j
Member
posted September 01, 2001 09:16 AM
eagle i would n't be remodleing it will be a brand new chassis from statch the cage will be a copy of my uncles shaw mod just with a stock tail section to the top of the rear tires so i can use the stock mounts for the rear end then if later on i wanted i would put a new rear clip on it just like we did with his mod with year. custom you run in des moines right you may have raced against this car my buddy bought then it was 4ord bob southerland .94 carlburge car. i timed the stock cars and the b mods there and the stock cars are turning almost identical times with a 390 carb and a full body so i don't think it would be much different with a bigger carb and a lighter body.i'm not looking to set the world on fire with this thing just wanna have some fun


CUSTOMPERFORMANCE
Member
posted September 01, 2001 04:32 PM
yes i have probably raced against that car. where i am coming from is when you go to all the work of getting the frame squared to bending the tubing, its not going to take much longer to build a tube rear frame with different rear suspension mounts than to leave stock. other than cost for some suspension parts building either frame takes almost as long. also like eagle said, sometimes repairing a car costs or takes as much time as building new. i wrecked my car once and had to stub it and it took almost as much time and money as building a new chassis.


racer17j
Member
posted September 01, 2001 09:40 PM
i was going to build a new hobby this year anyway so the time wouldn't be all that much more then it would for our hobby chassis the reason i was considering this is the amount of stock parts i have all kinds of stubs with rotted rear horns but the fronts are still good my class now will not allow me to put new rear horns on unless they are stock so u basicly just keep them around incase we need to stub a car and for the suspention parts. i'm looking for the lowest buck i can get by with i would prefer to buy a used chassis but right now beings the tubing is supplied thats my best bet


eagleii
unregistered
posted September 02, 2001 06:15 AM           
Racer17j,

If time is not critical and you have the equipment, I say go for it. You can only gain knowledge and experience by doing it yourself, not to mention the pride you will have when it is finished.

I have been doing this a long time and have built everything from go-karts to late models. It still humbles me each time I see that I have taken someone else's "junk" (most race cars start with a frame from the wrecking yard), some tubing, a few parts, and with a lot of time and patience, I have turned it into something entirely different than what it was before. A race car! There is nothing like the feeling of watching one of your cars go around the track for the first time.

So fire up the equipment and have some fun. No chassis builder ever woke up one morning and said,"I think today I am going start building race cars for a living". EVERY chassis builder, large or small, built his first race car in a garage somewhere. Or like me, in the back yard.

Good luck to you. If I can be of any assistance to you, let me know. You can e-mail me and/or call me.

Jerry

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EagleII

[This message has been edited by eagleii (edited September 02, 2001).]

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