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Author Topic:   Coil over leaf rear susp. ?
Goldigger
unregistered
posted April 17, 2001 12:08 AM           
Is anyone running a simple coil over leaf rear susp.? How well do these suspensions work in the simple form - IE no brake floaters etc. Do you use leaf sliders or what, and which track conditions do they work best or even hold an advantage if any? Do you use a fifth arm with this setup? Pondering the use of this rear suspension, any comments, advice or war stories welcome. Modified or Late model or B-mod even.


Goldigger
unregistered
posted April 19, 2001 11:51 PM           
Wa? Nobody know what this is?


CUSTOMPERFORMANCE
Member
posted April 20, 2001 12:56 AM
follow the landrum spring companys illistration for installation. mount the left coil ahead of housing, right behind. get the second lightest mono springs which is around
30-40 lbs. 150-175 coils to start. mount brake floaters on both rear wheels to help control wrap up of monos when braking. plus the brake floaters can be used to make the car tighter going in the corner and through the middle. the fifth arm/torque arm works well with this setup. depends on length of fifth arm. use shackles or sliders in rear of springs and get the teflon or urethane bushings for the front of leafs.

richard

CUSTOMPERFORMANCE
Member
posted April 20, 2001 12:59 AM
a former co worker ran this setup on his 97 harris. its a fast setup but requires more maintenence than a link setup. you have to watch your leafs for twist and lost arch.


fury
Member
posted April 20, 2001 10:25 AM
for the half leafs here is what a former friend ran on his dw car and also what the all time leader for imca wins has run on their cars.(all time leader for wins is dave farren of des moines iowa)
half leafs, multi leafs cut in half
200 lbs springs on top of the housing
brake floaters on both sides or at least the right side
j bar mounted to the frame on left and right on pinion.
just watch for lost arch on the halfs, if they lose arch take them out and compare to another set you have made and hammer back to the same arch. this is done to keep the wheelbase in line where it needs to be. when mounting leafs use adjustable clamps so you can adjust the lead or trail of rearend.
both ran about a 40 inch long spring loaded pull bar with the front mount on a slider to adj angle. use a 600-700 lb spring in the pullbar.


CUSTOMPERFORMANCE
Member
posted April 20, 2001 07:19 PM
golddigger chk private message


hanksnow
Member
posted April 21, 2001 04:07 PM
I had d&m chassis make me some floater brackets for leafs the set-up had ungodly good bite and the car turned and worked good probably fastest car i ever saw bar none BUT it broke things bad you couldn't get 5 laps out of it before it just broke things all to **** . I played with this set-up parts of 2 years and have a lot of data and the cures if anybody wants them
I should clarifiy cures Its what i would do to cure it. My problem is i wanted something simple and that set-up kept getting more complex. One thing i will tell the casual observer is don't float both work on the right one first.

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I have dirt in my veins



Racer4
unregistered
posted May 14, 2001 02:32 PM           
Magpie here you go, and I'm sure there are others older than this.


magpie
Member
posted May 14, 2001 03:23 PM
INSTEAD OF A CLAMPED BRACKET FOR YOUR BRAKES, A FLOATER IS A BRACKET WHICH FLOATS LIKE A BIRD CAGE FOR A 4 LINK BUT HAS JUST THE BRAKE BRACKET WELDED ON IT WITH A MOUNT FOR ONE LINK. WHEN PUTTING THE MOUNTS ON THE CAR START WITH THE LEFT SIDE LEVEL AND HAVE ENOUGH HOLES TO GO 5-10 DEGREES UP AND DOWN. RIGHT SIDE SET LEVEL TO 5 DEGREES UP TO 20 DEGREES UP. THESE FEED THE BRAKING FORCES THROUGH THE CHASSIS INSTEAD OF THE SUSPENSION. BY CHANGING THE ANGLES OF THEM YOU CAN INFLUENCE BITE AT EITHER REAR TIRE UNDER BRAKING. THIS IS USEFUL IF YOUR BASIC SETUP IS GOOD BUT YOU NEED TO BE A LITTLE TIGHTER OR LOOSER UNDER BRAKING AND DONT WANT TO CHANGE THE CAR OR BRAKE BIAS. THE FLOATERS IN CERTAIN CASES HELP MORE THAN CHANGING BIAS.