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Author Topic:   Adjustable Lowering Block
RangeRover
Member
posted November 19, 2002 12:34 PM
It depends on what the car is doing and what arch springs you have,with big arches when compressed the wheel will move back and when arched (like the left rear) the wheel moves forward. If you have no arch in your spring at rest and when you go into the corner the rr will move forward and thats why there are springs with little or no arch and there are springs with like 5-7 inches of arch, you have to figure your wheel travel and simulate the wheel moving forward or bakward and for whatever track you will race on will dictate what to do for adjusting lead in the axle. Like if it pushes bad on entry or if it is way loose on entry, adjusting the lead can help or hurt it. I like big arch springs, I run three inch lowering blocks, but it is also in a big dodge and it is low to the ground. You have to set up the front suspension first to determine your rears ride height, then make the car a half to one inch higher in the rear.
c21, are you from Estevan?


c21
Member
posted November 25, 2002 02:04 PM
I know of a guy that races and his number is c21 and he always posts with that name, thats why I asked.

[This message has been edited by CAGEMAN (edited November 26, 2002).]

c21
Member
posted November 27, 2002 10:19 AM
I hear ya cluckin' big chicken!


RangeRover
Member
posted December 02, 2002 09:18 AM
I'm working on a '77 Nova and haven't messed with leaf springs in a while. I bought Landrum springs and new spring pads to weld on when setting pinion angle on the new Ford 9" from a Lincoln Versailles. The left side spring has more arch (and rate) than the right side, so should I use a 2" lowering block on the left and the 1.5" adjustable lowering block on the right. I'm trying to make the new car as good as possible right out of the box. What can you camaro and nova guys suggest?


c21
Member
posted December 02, 2002 11:33 AM
Sounds like a reasonable place to start. I'd put it on the scales before you put it on the track. Keep in mind that it is normal to have a higher frame height on the right than left (.5" to 1" or so higher) so the extra arch on the Left (are we talking mixing dirt and asphalt springs?) may require more of a block to get your proper ride heights .... but you got to get it on the scales before you know anything.

On a side note, depending on how banked your track is (or more specifally isn't) this set up may give you a lot of roll oversteer.

c21

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