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Author Topic:   FRONT TIRE STAGGER
YAZ
Member
posted March 09, 2002 12:06 AM
CAN ANY ONE TELL ME HOW FRONT TIRE
STAGGER DOES?


redneck racing
Member
posted March 09, 2002 12:46 AM
Front tire stagger helps the car to turn i run a 245-60 on the passengers side of the car and a 235-60 on the drivers side, so in a nutshell stagger = the size of the tires minus each other, so if you have an 86" tire on your passengers side and an 84" on the drivers side you take 86"-84" = 2" of front stagger.


SLEEPY GOMEZ
Member
posted March 09, 2002 06:13 PM
quote:
Originally posted by YAZ:
CAN ANY ONE TELL ME HOW FRONT TIRE
STAGGER DOES?

Actually, ther4e is no such thing as front tire stagger. Stagger is done when both wheels are tied together an turn on the same axle. With "front tire stagger" you are changing the cross weight just klike having weight jacks. Weight jacks are better because the ride height can be maintained while changing cross weight.

My suggestion is to take a pocketful of left front tires of different diameters to the track. Change to smaller size to put in cross weight and larger to remove it. This way you can adjust push and loose characteristics on corner entry.

EVANSRACING24E
Member
posted March 09, 2002 11:06 PM
you can also get stagger by using wheel spacers. moving the tires out farther helps alot with handling. wider is better.


SLEEPY GOMEZ
Member
posted March 09, 2002 11:43 PM
quote:
Originally posted by YAZ:
CAN ANY ONE TELL ME HOW FRONT TIRE
STAGGER DOES?

Stagger is refers to differences in tire diameter (circumfrence) only. Wheel spacers do not change stagger but they can help handling when used properly. I don't think i would space out left side wheels, this reduces left weight which makes a car fast.

WesternAuto17
Member
posted March 11, 2002 09:27 AM
So, if I have weight jacks on all four corners, should I run 3 tires the same size with a larger one on the RR?


te33
Member
posted March 11, 2002 08:50 PM
quote:
Originally posted by te33:
i run 3 the same size(within a 1/4)and a smaller one on the left rear(3 inches).the 3 the same size are the largest i can run (225/70's)the other one is a 215/70 to get the needed stagger.as far as "front stagger"sleepys right.its like a running 350 for 50 bucks.its fiction.hey sleepy are you the same guy from circle track?

Yeah, the same Sleepy. However sometimes I'm wide awake.

RangeRover
Member
posted March 12, 2002 05:27 PM
Nice to see you made it Sleepy.

Jammin


SLEEPY GOMEZ
Member
posted March 13, 2002 07:29 PM
quote:
Originally posted by WesternAuto17:
So, if I have weight jacks on all four corners, should I run 3 tires the same size with a larger one on the RR?

You could certainly run 3 tires the same size. Use a larger right rear to achieve the necessary stagger to keep the car off the wall coming out. That is enough stagger so you don't have a push on corner exit. SLEEPY

YAZ
Member
posted March 13, 2002 11:28 PM
THANKS FOR THE INFO.
LAST SEASON I RAN 4" DIFFERENCE
IN THE FRONT. I HAD A BAD PUSH
WHEN THE TRACK WAS WET. IF I GO
TO ONLY 2" WILL THIS HELP ME OUT?


c21
Member
posted March 14, 2002 10:45 AM
Front tire stagger affects ride height only. It does not work the same as the rear as the front wheels rotate independent of each other unlike the rear tires. We run 'em straight up.


c21
Member
posted March 14, 2002 11:01 AM
Yaz,
It is usually advisable to run less cross when the track is sloppy. My best advice would be to try different stagger (and tire pressures for that matter) front and rear while you are on the scales to get a better idea of how much effect a particular change may have.

Bottom line though, a realy bad push would suggest too much cross. Try taking some stagger out of the front, 2" might be fine. Some guys like to add stagger to the rear and take it out of the front early in the eve when the track is sloppy. Sometimes it's convienant top swap both lefts (with each other) to take something like an inch out of the rear and move it up front after the track starts to come in.
Good Luck


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