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Author Topic:   4-link HELP!!
Shaner429
Member
posted December 29, 2000 02:01 PM
I just got a 4-link 93 Fergers Chassis that I am going to be running in the Midwest Modified Class in Minnesota on the 1/2 mile tracks Arlington, Alexandria, Princeton, and Montevideo. I have never run a modified before and was just wondering if any of you mod. gooroos had any input for me? I have been a driver for about 4 years so I am not a complete idiot...just mostly. I will be running the e-85 ethanol fuel in a ford 302. Any help on anything that y'all think is important would be greatly appreciated from lug torque to setups I need all can get!!!! Please take pity on me -Shaner
P.S. Jammin, thanks for running this page it has shown me how much I have to learn before May


b00
Member
posted December 30, 2000 07:28 AM
I will try to get the book. I know that the fegers made a book for this chassis but it has been hard to find since the car is so old and technology has come so far. the car does still have the stock rear monts. I'm going to be running the Midwest mod class do you think it is worth the update? I have not driven for about three years but I was running in the hobby division in a 72 Torino. Stock rear suspention other then shocks and springs. I'm living in Prior Lake now. any other info of any type anything you can think of is helpful. thanks for the input so far guys!!


b00
Member
posted December 30, 2000 09:08 PM
Hey, bOO... Which car you with at Princeton?? I drove the M1 Wissota mod there for the last 4 years, prolly know ya. Incidentally, I'd have to agree so far with your comments regarding the conversion to the 3-link. It's a cheap conversion, allowing a lot more adjustment options that the stock 4-link, but one more thing I'd have done if I had to do it again would have been to make a few more holes to mount the front of the lower arms into to change thier angle without affecting ride hieght. Haven't raced that style of set-up for a few years, having gone to a 4-bar and then a z-link, but it is pretty much idiot proof and a great place to start for a new guy.

If you have any more questions, I'd be happy to help.. see you at the track.

Matt

Shaner429
Member
posted January 03, 2001 09:48 AM
Ok so now I really feel dumb . I am a little confused, in a three link setup is there 3 points that attach to the rear end or is there 5? Is this conversion something I can do at home or do I need to take it to fergers to get it done. Keeping in mind with enof info my team is a competent fabricator. thanks so much for the input guys.

[This message has been edited by jammin (edited January 03, 2001).]

GnarlyCar
Member
posted January 03, 2001 02:55 PM
Shaner,
Don't feel dumb, it's confusing to a lot of people. The 3-link conversion will actually have 4 links, but it's just called a 3 link..I have no idea why. The converted 3-link in your case would consist of the stock length lower control arms mounted to rigid mounts on the rear end and their stock mounts at the chassis; a panhard bar either in front of or behind the rear end housing, and either a lift bar or a pullbar projected forward from the rear end housing. Any of these configurations would actually have 4 links, but the name "4-link" has already been taken to describe something that actually has 5 or 6 links. Not to be confused with a "stock 4-link" which is what you have now. Confused yet? Me too..
Anyway, I did a conversion 3 years ago that sounds like exactly what you want to do to yours. I had a stock 4-link that I converted to a 3-link. What I did was remove the upper links and added mounts to the rear end housing for a lift bar and a panhard bar, leaving the lower trailing arms in thier stock locations. It was a good working car, but as I said in my previous post I would have added a few more mounting holes to the chassis end of the lower arms to give some more adjustment options regarding the angles of the trailing arms.
It's a relatively inexpensive conversion; you can buy a lift bar kit from Cobra Chassis(which is what I did) for around $250 including the fifth coil and slider, and you can make your own panhard mounts easy enough, just make sure they're heavy enough; I broke mine off the axle tube twice before I got it right. If you decide to go with a pullbar, it'll probably be cheaper yet, as you wouldn't have to buy the whole 5th coil assembly.. you could run a solid bar, a rubber bisquit type bar, or a spring loaded bar, but that'd get you back up into the $250 nieghborhood, and you probably wouldn't get a enough feel for your car for a few years to even know how to adjust it anyway. Don't get me wrong, I'm sure you're quite intelligent, but there's just no substitute for seat time.
Your best bet regarding fabrication would be to get a look at an assembled example of both the lift bar and the pullbar,regardless of whether it's on a 4-bar, z-link, or 3-link. They're easy to understand once you see them, as long as you go in with the knowledge that all these styles are based on the same idea that they are relying on the rearward torque and forward thrust of the rear end housing to gain thier traction aiding effect. But it's very important to fully understand it before you start cutting up your car. I think there's a link to the afco website somewhere in this site; there's some really good reading in there that'll help you get a handle on all this.

I hope I didn't confuse you further, but if I did e-mail me and I'll try to explain it a little better.

Matt
WhiplashM1@aol.com


Shaner429
Member
posted January 11, 2001 11:19 AM
Matt, you have so helpful with info in the past thank you so much for all the input!! I honestly do understand the value of seat time Matt and I know it is going to take a couple of years of eating exhaust and mud to get to where I want to be. Hopefully with the assistance of helpful and generous guys like you it will be me that is making me eat exhaust instead of the car I will check out the afco web sit and see if I can find the "Pullbar" and the "Lift bar" info as I really don't have much other then a very general idea of what they do...just to clarify the rear end of my car has two lower mounts going to the outer edge of the rear end and two upper ones that go to the middle of the floater. what is this type of suspension called exactly? What is a Birdcage and a J-bar? thanks again for all the help!!


GnarlyCar
Member
posted January 14, 2001 11:09 PM
Shaner,
The suspension you have, if I understand correctly, is what's known 'round these parts as a "stock 4-link". It's described as "stock" because the links are mounted to the factory chassis mounting points. This isn't among the more desireable rear suspension designs as it's configuration lends itself to a natural bind.
A "j-bar" is a type of panhard bar that mounts to the front side of the rear end housing, the "J" shape being there to turn it over the top of the pinion to a mounting bracket bolted to the front of the gearcase on the right side of the rear end. There are a lot of ideas as to the advantages coming from this style of mounting the bar, but through my secondhand experience (having a brother-in-law who's run them both ways on the same car), there doesn't seem to be a lot of difference from that to a straight bar across the back of the housing (as long as the lengths are close to the same). There may be a few guys in here who might not agree with that, but I'm just relaying what I was told.
The birdcage is a rear end mount that will actually rotate on the axle tube if one were to mount it without any trailing arms attached to it.Once the trailing arms are mounted, it's function is to allow the rear end housing to rotate freely rearward under acceleration to transfer all it's torque into the liftbar or pullbar without the inherent bind that comes from mounting the trailing arms directly and rigidly to the axle tube. A liftbar or pullbar will still function with the trailing arms mounted rigidly, but with the rear end in birdcages it's reaction is a lot smoother and a lot more consistent. I've run the same car with both styles of mounts so I can tell you firsthand, even after having a winter break between running the two styles, that it's a night and day difference.. at least with the HP of a full modified drivetrain. If you're running your car as a b-mod, it probably won't have as profound an effect as it did with mine, given that the b-mods rely so much more on momentum than forward bite.

Hope I cleared some things up for you.. If there's anything else I could help you with, please don't hesitate to drop me an e-mail.. I'd be more than happy to help in any way I can.

Good Luck,
Matt
WhiplashM1@aol.com


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