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Author Topic:   rear spring location
MOD#11
unregistered
posted September 10, 2000 07:10 PM           
Quite a few cars are going to both rear springs on top of rear on two-links and I was wondering why,and what are the advantages and disadvantages of such a set-up.I know a big advantage is getting rid of the sliders,but do the cars hook up as well and do you have to change the set-up to make it work?The mor opinions the better.thanks


web01
unregistered
posted September 10, 2000 07:47 PM           
the main reason on the 2 link to put the coils on top of housing is to get rid of the sliders. you have to change setup a little bit. it does not work as well as having the coils mounted on sliders with both ahead of axle or left in front and right behind. when you mount on sliders and depending on where they are mounted you can use the axle wrap up to your advantage of loading or unloading the wedge in the chassis.


wfoondirt
Member
posted September 10, 2000 09:14 PM
just curious, why do you say that getting rid of the sliders in an advantage?


CUSTOMPERFORMANCE
Member
posted September 10, 2000 11:28 PM
most people feel that getting rid of the sliders and putting the springs on top of the rearend takes some bind out of the chassis, which it does. if you properly maintain your sliders you shouldnt have bind anyway. with the springs on top you have no way of manipulating the wedge in the chassis under acceleration. when you have both springs ahead of rearend you have both tires being loaded under acceleration. when you have the left ahead and thhe right behind you are manipulating the wedge in chassis under acceleration, the right is unloading as the left is loading, adding wedge which in returns able you to come off corners harder when the track is geting slick or is dry slick.


DElliott19
Member
posted September 15, 2000 10:38 AM
I am new to a three link with the springs on top of the axle tubes. I have a brand new HOT chassis and was wanting some different opinions to see if i can make this work alittle better. If with the springs on top doesn't load under acceleration then do i need to run more left rear bite or crossweight to get some of the same advantages off the turn on dryslicktracks. I also changed my spring bar to the right side of the drive shaft and i can feel it load the left off on exit. Just looking for any little thing to help. I ran a swing arm for 5yrs and its hard to get adjusted to this new setup. Any little tidbits of info would be aprreciated.

Thanks
David Elliott
IMCA # 19


quote:
Originally posted by CUSTOMPERFORMANCE:
most people feel that getting rid of the sliders and putting the springs on top of the rearend takes some bind out of the chassis, which it does. if you properly maintain your sliders you shouldnt have bind anyway. with the springs on top you have no way of manipulating the wedge in the chassis under acceleration. when you have both springs ahead of rearend you have both tires being loaded under acceleration. when you have the left ahead and thhe right behind you are manipulating the wedge in chassis under acceleration, the right is unloading as the left is loading, adding wedge which in returns able you to come off corners harder when the track is geting slick or is dry slick.



jammin
Administrator
posted September 15, 2000 01:16 PM
Exactly Dell....you will have to increase your static cross to make up the difference. What will this do? It will make it more difficult on entry, but better on exit. Since the HOT cars seem to roll really well, it might not affect you too much. The trick is going to get the car where it will set in the turns, which will require a lot of roll with this setup.


DElliott19
Member
posted September 15, 2000 02:36 PM
I do get a lot of Body roll. I have another question for you. I run a panhard bar that connects to the frame on the right hand side and the axle on the left. Backwards for most dirt applications. I have gone from running the bar uphill to the right to now running down hill to the right. It is alot better and the car is more stable with it the downhill to the right. With the springbar on the left hand side the car would pull the left front up real easy, but since i moved it over to the other side of the drive shaft it still does but not near as much. So i guess what i am asking is if you know of starting points on panhard bars mounted the way i am running it. I read all over the AFCO sites and couldn't get much info on it that way. One other thing is what about a bushed straight panhard bar and if so what angle do you think i need to run. TO much angle that way would seem to plant too hard and probably pull the left front up under acceleration too.
Anyway thanks for any information you might have.

David Elliott

quote:
Originally posted by jammin:
Exactly Dell....you will have to increase your static cross to make up the difference. What will this do? It will make it more difficult on entry, but better on exit. Since the HOT cars seem to roll really well, it might not affect you too much. The trick is going to get the car where it will set in the turns, which will require a lot of roll with this setup.



jammin
Administrator
posted September 15, 2000 04:05 PM
Well...I personally run the chassis mount on the panhard on the left and axle mount on right, but if you think about your setup. When the car rolls...more angle on your setup will move over the RR and try to push down on the spring over the axle. This will work fine on a tacky track, but where does the pressure on the left rear(bite) come into play? It can only come from your static wedge settings. You can run off the RR for a while, but when the track gets dry, are you coming off as fast as you should? Also, are you feathering your RR tires excessively?


DElliott19
Member
posted September 18, 2000 03:07 PM
I understand that on the load and about feathering the rr. What about running a J-bar or the left on left short bar. Wouldn't that give some left rear bite or transfer some weight to the LR under acceleration? I believe that there is a point to which you can run to much left rear bite or weight. In my mind it get you off but will you suffer the affects of too much LR half way down the staight away. With a backwards tricycle affect. I know on my old car which was a swing arm car it did this with over 53 to 54% cross, or 180 to 190 LR Bite. But this is a 3-link, would the reactions be different on this suspension?
Any thoughts or ideas?
David


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