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Author Topic:   Metric Four-Link Tricks???
Speed Racer X
Dirt Maniac

Total posts: 115
posted August 30, 2003 09:53 PM  
We are getting ready to start on next years car. We be using a early 80's GM metric frame. Would anyone care share any tricks on how to get more forward bite and possibly rear steer? I'm thinking (usally gets me in trouble) that raising the front of the lower control arms may help, but would like to talk to some who has experience. I have several Steve Smith books, but they don't go into this. I there somthing to read that would cover this subject? Thanks in advance for the help!!!

Eljojo
Dirt Forum Champ
Total posts: 968
posted August 31, 2003 12:38 PM  
I have had success in getting better forward bite by lowering the mounting point of the control arms on the underside of the differential. The more angle they have (up to the front) the more the rear tires will "lift" the rear of the car on exit. I no loger own a metric, but in retrospect I wish I would have lengthened the lower trailing arms, put more angle in them by lowering the rear mounting and raising the front mountain, and RAISED the mounting points of the uppers on the differential housing. What I did do is to reailgn the angle the uppers have to the rear, making one parallel with the car and left the bushing out of the other. I put a panhard bar on to keep the rear centered and the car drove incredibly. Tech threw a fit after I shattered the track qualifying record and I went to work undoing all I had done.....that's racin'!

AUS RACING
Dirt Full Roller

Total posts: 28
posted September 01, 2003 04:56 AM  
try running soft rubber bushes in the rh control arms & hard bushes in the left. When you step on the gas comming off the turns this lets the right rear walk forward tightening up the rear. We run this set-up & find the right wheel moves forward up to 1/4"

STOCK64
Dirt Roller

Total posts: 23
posted September 04, 2003 09:59 PM  
IVE GOT A 85 CUTLASS IMCA STOCKCAR... I WAS ALWAY GREAT ON TACKY (LITTLE TIGHT) BUT WHEN IT DRIED OUT I WENT BACKWARDS... NO FORWARD BITE... I WAS TIGHT AT THE APEX AND LOOSE OFF.... SO I LEVELED MY LOWER TRAILING ARMS TO ALLOW THE WEIGHT TO TRANSFER TO THE REAR FASTER SINCE ITS AT ITS LONGEST POINT AND IS NOT TRYING TO HOLD UP THE CAR. I RUN ABOUT 52.7% LEFT, AND 52% REAR TACKY, AND 55% REAR ON DRY SLICK. I FOUND I COULD REALLY LOWER MY CROSS A TON... IM DOWN TO 48% CROSS.. I HAVE NO BITE (NO SPLIT IN THE REAR) IN THE CAR AT ALL AND 100 LBS LEFT FRONT SPLIT... SOUNDS WEIRD BUT MAN IT SURE SEEMED TO WORK AWSOME... WHEN I DID THIS I WAS ABLE TO RUN ANYWHERE ON THE TRACK AND CHANGE LANES ANYTIME I WANTED. AND THE FORWARD BITE SEEMED ALOT BETTER. ONE WOULD THINK THIS WOULD CAUSE THE CAR TO BE REALLY LOOSE BUT IT WASNT... MAYBE SOMEONE COULD TELL ME WHY THIS SEEMED TO WORK...

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WINNING ISN'T EVERYTING, WANTING TO IS...

SLEEPY GOMEZ
Dirt Freak

Total posts: 295
posted September 04, 2003 10:36 PM  
Eljojo, you have it right, lower the rear mounting point of the lower trailing arm. On the Ford 9' floater rears you get from most manufacturers the lower mounting point will be about 1 5/16" lower than the stock position metric position. Given a choice, I don't believe IMCA legal, I would lower them more than that to say 2 3/4". That is much easier than moving the mounting points on the chassis. In doing this you must rotate the mounting point slightly forward on the axle housing to retain the stock pinion angle when using stock length trailing arms. Don't play with pinion angle, there is no gain there. SLEEPY

mtwrght29
Dirt Full Roller

Total posts: 39
posted September 08, 2003 08:39 PM  
i agree with sleepy and eljojo 100% i used afco lower trailing arm brackets on mine they are much longer than stock and have 3 different holes to adjust and i used stock bushings on rearend side of upper control arms which i drilled holes in to soften and urethane everywhere else to act kind of like a rubber buiscuit bar

tyfyter
Dirt Roller

Total posts: 19
posted May 09, 2005 12:27 PM  
Given what Sleepy and Eljojo says, changing ride height will affect the trailing arm angles. I like to run the ride height as low as possible, but it would seem that I may loose forward bite because the lower trailing arms run with less angle. Is there a sweet spot to consider when setting the rear ride height and trailing arm angle?

    

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