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Author Topic:   Oil pressure gauge line
Dmac
Dirt Roller

Total posts: 23
posted October 28, 2004 08:05 PM  
I am new at this so I will have many Questions. My clear line from my oil pressure gauge is cracked so I am going to replace it. Do I need to run the car once I have attached it to the motor to prime it or just attach it to the gauge as well and it just works on pressure without oil in the line?

econo2a
Dirt Maniac

Total posts: 104
posted October 28, 2004 09:01 PM  
just put it on the gauge if it dont work prime it but all i do is hook it up

bfx racing
Dirt Full Roller

Total posts: 42
posted October 28, 2004 11:03 PM  
new myself but...
I was told by others to replace the clear /plastic line with a steel line or even copper
hope it helps

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outlawstock17
Dirt Forum Champ
Total posts: 1363
posted October 29, 2004 05:52 AM  
i use -4 rubber push lock hose and fittings. it makes the guage more sensitive. the i.d. is bigger and you don't have any "bottlenecks" like you do with lines that have crush sleeves.

redneck racing
Dirt Forum Champ
Total posts: 860
posted October 29, 2004 11:39 AM  
Mines about the same as Outlaws,its hydraulic line that a buddy made for me. Eddie

gould
Dirt Forum Champ
Total posts: 730
posted October 29, 2004 07:08 PM  
i use a stainless steel braided line. if you get hot oil on you once you will switch that plastic line out.

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Eric Pattridge
Dirt Full Roller

Total posts: 48
posted October 30, 2004 07:54 AM  
I had a similar deal. except line wasnt cracked. I was told the same thing Gould had posted. You dont want the hot oil on you. Replaced with a copper line (will probably go to steel braided line next). Just replace it and start it up, oil pressure should show right up on the gauge.

sixwillwin
Dirt Freak

Total posts: 493
posted October 30, 2004 07:58 AM  
-4 size braided line, wouldnt ever use anything else, easy on and off also.

waltonjr1
Dirt Forum Champ
Total posts: 516
posted November 02, 2004 07:34 AM  
Every fitting on my car is AN, makes things alot easier and neater.


Dmac
Dirt Roller

Total posts: 23
posted November 02, 2004 07:41 PM  
What is a "AN" fitting?

waltonjr1
Dirt Forum Champ
Total posts: 516
posted November 03, 2004 11:21 AM  

Also called JIC fitting

[This message has been edited by waltonjr1 (edited November 03, 2004).]

sixwillwin
Dirt Freak

Total posts: 493
posted November 03, 2004 03:32 PM  
AN Fitting Technology

The U.S. armed forces have employed outside contractors to build equipment to their specifications for years. The acronym "AN" comes from the term Army/Navy and, to keep up with the ever-increasing demands placed on hydraulic equipment in battle, engineers devised certain parameters that any product must meet. The moniker "AN" was used to describe both the steel braided hose and aluminum fittings that transcended the military world into the automotive aftermarket over a period of years. The first AN hose and fittings used on a race car were probably some discarded aircraft equipment stripped from a decommissioned plane and sold to an eager racer at a fraction of its original cost. Although the armed forces still use equipment that employs AN fittings and hose, this technology can be seen more readily on the streets and racetracks nationwide.

There are currently two types of fittings used on cars today: SAE and JIC. Every stock hose and fitting from the major auto manufacturers, with the exception of a few power-steering hoses, comes with an SAE standard, 45-degree flare on its end. All AN fittings incorporate a 37-degree JIC flare. The letters "JIC" stand for Joint Industry Council, which developed the standards for aircraft hose technology early in the 20th century. The reason for the 37-degree flare was simple. The JIC didn't want any automotive hoses or fittings to cross over to aircraft applications. This would prevent unsafe cost-cutting that might jeopardize aircraft safety. If you're building a car that combines AN hoses and fittings with custom-bent hard lines, be sure to use the correct 37-degree flaring tool on any intersecting fittings.

Hose Technology

The braiding used to cover AN hose was designed to protect it from abrasion and provide the maximum pressure capabilities. The working and burst pressures of AN hose are determined by the make-up of its internal layers. Usually constructed of several overlapping layers of rubber and nylon or stainless steel inner braid, most AN hose with a stainless steel outer braid can withstand sustained working pressures up to 250 psi and maximum operating pressures around 1,500 psi.

Ironically, that great-looking braided stainless steel hose covering is also very abrasive to the components surrounding it and has been known to wear holes in aluminum tubes and scratch even the hardest polished surfaces. For those plumbing a race car with lengths of braided stainless hose, there are various ways to cover the hose and protect its surroundings.

Earl's offers Ruff-Stuff hose, which is simply its Perform-O-Flex braided stainless steel hose with a thin rubber covering. Another popular option, and one that's used often in extreme racing circles such as Winston Cup, is Earl's Flame Guard hose covering. As the name implies, this covering can operate around 500-degree-F parts all day long and withstand splashes of hot oil up to 2,000 degrees F. It can be slipped over any size AN hose, from -3 to -20, and will save the hose from hot exhaust while saving surrounding parts from the hose at the same time.

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Gene
Dirt Freak

Total posts: 396
posted November 03, 2004 04:18 PM  
Very good post sixwillwin.

pmiracing
Dirt Full Roller

Total posts: 44
posted November 29, 2004 06:44 PM  
I will never run plastic line again. I ran it last year , I thought I would be smart and run a rubber fuel line over it so it wouldn't rub through but it melted when an exhaust dounut blew and that fuel line just directed the hot oil into the cockpit. braided oil lines are cheep (15-20 bucks)and well worth it.

harome1xc
Dirt Full Roller

Total posts: 52
posted December 03, 2004 08:38 PM  
No priming necessairy. It seems like the air would throw things off but I have always had it and gauge responds well. I guess if you were really concerned about it, you could blead the air out maybe for an increased and faster responding gauge. But I have never had a problem.

Raz_900
Dirt Forum Champ
Total posts: 635
posted December 09, 2004 03:34 PM  
Electric gauges here. Years ago dad had installed a mechanical oil press. gauge in our Blazer. When the line broke and spewed oil all over the place in the middle of BFE 3 hours from home no vacation, I decided I'd never run a mechanical gauge. I've had the same gauge for 4 years (due for replacement this year) and it's been fine. Added benefit is the oil and water gauges only add 2 little 18g wires. Makes motor swaps a little simpler.

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