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Author Topic:   Looking for stats
51racing
Dirt Maniac

Total posts: 138
posted May 12, 2004 08:15 AM  
I was having a discussion with my g/f last night, who is freaked out after I almost rolled on Friday. I contend that I am more likely to suffer a fatality on my drive to work every day than I am on the track, driving a car that is much safer. Does anyone know where I can find stats to back up my point?

19J
Dirt Freak

Total posts: 370
posted May 12, 2004 10:15 AM  
Here is some stats lol. People die on road compared to track 100,876:1 just tell her this and all might get better. My g/f was the same way but i didnt really care about stats or anything. I was racing and bottom line. good luck lol.

51racing
Dirt Maniac

Total posts: 138
posted May 12, 2004 10:46 AM  
quote:
Originally posted by 19J:
Here is some stats lol. People die on road compared to track 100,876:1 just tell her this and all might get better. My g/f was the same way but i didnt really care about stats or anything. I was racing and bottom line. good luck lol.


is that an actual stat? I don't find it hard to believe if it is. If so, where did you get that from?

juliaferrell
Dirt Freak

Total posts: 370
posted May 12, 2004 09:20 PM  
Every state has a race regulating state agency. Call them and they will give you all the stats you need.

WesternAuto17
Dirt Forum Champ
Total posts: 569
posted May 13, 2004 08:14 AM  
This is really long winded, but I love a good debate, so here goes. The 100,876:1 stat is wrong for a couple of reasons.

First, the number of poeple killed in highway accidents in the US last year was around 40,000 (no where near 100,000) and that was slightly more than average. On top of that, the number of drivers killed in race cars last year was more than one.

Second, comparing highway deaths to racing deaths is incorrect. Your odds of being killed in a highway accident is about 7500 to 1 in any given year (300 million Americans divided by 40,000 highway fatalities). That assumes that every person in the US is riding/driving on the highways. In a direct comparison, your odds, in general, of dying in a race car are incalculably small because you divide the number of racing deaths by the population. Of course the odds are lower, but its inaccurate comparison because a small fraction of the population is even exposed to the risk. In order to accurately compare them, you have to look at the percentage of poeple who ride on or drive on the highway and end up killed compared to the percentage of race car drivers who end up killed on the race track.

Also, one other thing to remember - while your race car might be safer than the Geo Metro you drive to work, while in the race car your in a much more dangerous situation. You can drive to work for years and never get into even a minor wreck, but if you go a month on a dirt track without a wreck, you're doing well.

So, in my humble opinion, you can't really make a statistical argument for racing being a safe activity because, even though racing might be safer than than hauling the car to the track, its still dangerous and you are adding exposure to that risk.

All that said, I have no plans to quit and I hope you don't either.

alias
Dirt Full Roller

Total posts: 43
posted May 13, 2004 10:10 AM  
I thought 19J was just makin' up a number
to be funny I don't plan on quiting any time
soon either. My wife was really scared when
I first started racing, but she knows I love
it and she is very supportive now. She also
keeps me safety concious if I decide to do
anything stupid.

racerman707
Dirt Freak

Total posts: 374
posted May 13, 2004 10:24 AM  
I hate talking about this subject myself.

51racing
Dirt Maniac

Total posts: 138
posted May 13, 2004 10:31 AM  
quote:
Originally posted by WesternAuto17:

All that said, I have no plans to quit and I hope you don't either.


Nope, no plans to quit. This isn't for my sake, it was to make a point to the gf exactly what you said. Yes, it is dangerous, but I am more likely to die hauling the car an hour and a half to the track, than the time that I am on the track.

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