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Author Topic:   Shocks
GRTWallbanger
Dirt Maniac

Total posts: 196
posted December 07, 2004 12:26 PM  
I know some of the 4-bar cars are running easy-up shocks on the LR, Some as much as 2/8.
I was just wondering what the opinion is on front shocks?I like the easy-up on the front to help forward bite?
Like a pair of 3/5's
We ran imca hocky pucks so I think we can use forward bite.

[This message has been edited by GRTWallbanger (edited December 07, 2004).]

badfastjr
Dirt Maniac

Total posts: 193
posted December 07, 2004 01:11 PM  
im kinda interested in what everyone thinks about this too. im thinking of trying a bunch of new shock combinations and need some new ideas.

de94wcc
Dirt Forum Racer

Total posts: 87
posted December 07, 2004 01:18 PM  
Since we switched to the 4-bar, the car doesn't really seem to care what shocks we put on it. We still run an easy-up (30/60) on the RF, but most cars don't have trouble getting forward bite with the 4-bar suspension. We won't be spending any more money on split-valve stuff. Many of the USMTS regulars seem to go plenty fast with straight valve AFCO's and Pro's.

dirtbuster
Dirt Forum Champ
Total posts: 2007
posted December 07, 2004 01:56 PM  
We tried a 5-3(Compression-Rebound), 6-3 and 8-2 on the LR but we were doing it to help calm the car down when getting into the corner, not necessarily to get it on the bars easier. The 8-2 was a little too much we thought. The last one we tried was the 6-3 and it seemed to work pretty well. We were normally running 4 valves and didnt necessarily need to change the rebound, just wanted to stiffen the compression up. Would like to try a 7-3 or 7-4 next year to see what thats like.
We still ran easy ups on the front. Dont know whether it made a lot of difference but driver felt like it did so we left them.

CD00
Dirt Roller

Total posts: 14
posted December 07, 2004 04:24 PM  
RF 3/5 or a 2/6 (comp/reb)
LF 5/3
RR 40 or 2/4 (track has to be smooth)
LR 6/2 or 8/2 (to be really effective the shock needs to be on the rear with the spring)

Bilstein #'s
RF 50/30 or a 60/20
LF 30/50
RR 40/40 or 40/20
LR 20/80 or 20/60



badfastjr
Dirt Maniac

Total posts: 193
posted December 07, 2004 06:48 PM  
what about on a short three link?

FlyNLoIMCA17
Dirt Forum Champ
Total posts: 753
posted December 07, 2004 07:33 PM  
My 4-bar car seems to car less if its even got a shock or not!! I have changed front shocks to no avail, straight-ups and split-valves, It doesn't seem to make any difference at all. I run on a tight turned dry slick 1/4 mile track. I can't feel any difference at all, but that might be because my but is still numb from the pounding it took to buy all these split valve shocks and other useless racing stuff!!!!


Good Luck

[This message has been edited by FlyNLoIMCA17 (edited December 08, 2004).]

Chad
Dirt Freak

Total posts: 269
posted December 08, 2004 09:30 AM  
I would agree with CD00. I run the easy up shocks on the left side and tie downs on the right. This is what alot of late model guys are doing and it was suggested to me by an engineer at Bilstein. I tried the setup two years ago, and haven't changed it. Works really well.

CD00- why do you suggest that running the shock with the spring on the LR would be more effective? I'm trying to think it through but haven't been able to understand why it would make a big difference. Wouldn't the shock better control the chassis on the front the birdcage- as the car rolls the birdcage rotates forward and the shock infront controls the rebound vs it being on the rear of the birdcage when it would intially be in compression before extending. Additionally, as the car drops, the birdcage rotates rearward the shock in the front would control the compression vs being on the rear when it would intialy go into rebound before compressing. Does this make sense??? Someone, let me know the correct thought process.

CD00
Dirt Roller

Total posts: 14
posted December 08, 2004 04:52 PM  
quote:
Originally posted by Chad:
I would agree with CD00. I run the easy up shocks on the left side and <a href="http://www.serverlogic3.com/lm/rtl3.asp?si=11&k=tie%20downs" onmouseover="window.status='tie downs'; return true;" onmouseout="window.status=''; return true;">tie downs</a> on the right. This is what alot of late model guys are doing and it was suggested to me by an engineer at Bilstein. I tried the setup two years ago, and haven't changed it. Works really well.

CD00- why do you suggest that running the shock with the spring on the LR would be more effective? I'm trying to think it through but haven't been able to understand why it would make a big difference. Wouldn't the shock better control the chassis on the front the birdcage- as the car rolls the birdcage rotates forward and the shock infront controls the rebound vs it being on the rear of the birdcage when it would intially be in compression before extending. Additionally, as the car drops, the birdcage rotates rearward the shock in the front would control the compression vs being on the rear when it would intialy go into rebound before compressing. Does this make sense??? Someone, let me know the correct thought process.


Chad,
I understand where you are coming from.
With my experience, I go back and forth.
It depends on conditions. Early in the
evening when the track still has bite, the
shock in front tames down the travel on the LR. To promote more travel, I mount it to
the rear. Shock is mounted solid to the
axle housing.
When considering the birdcage indexing, the
shock in the front has less travel. When mt.
it to the rear it gains more travel.
Its sounds weird but it works for me. Try it
sometime when you can.
Also my Bilsteins are the the type that I
can adjust the Gas Pressure. That makes a big difference.
CD00

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