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Author Topic:   2-Link question
black95gst
Dirt Roller

Total posts: 15
posted September 19, 2004 11:15 AM  
I know what the left(driver side) bar does when you move it up and down. But what does the one on the other side do. We've ran it on the bottom of 3 holes all year long cause we aren't sure and dont know what it does. Does it affect rear-steer like the otherside and traction or something completly different.

xhubby
Dirt Freak

Total posts: 376
posted September 19, 2004 03:12 PM  
It does the exact same thing as the left side, only it affects thr RR wheel.The more angle,(higher in front) the more bite to that wheel. We run our RR bar in the top hole, or the middle hole, depending on the track conditions. Here's what we found with our car on our track (each car & track is diff). With both bars in the top holes, as the car enters the corners & rolls onto the right rear, the right side drops and the left side raises. This pulls the left rear wheel forward as the angle in that bar,(back to front)increases. It then actually pushes the right rear wheel back, as angle is taken out of that bar when the chassis drops during roll. On our car on our track, this gives us the max. amount of rollsteer we can get with a short 2-link. With the right rear bar in the bottom hole, you might actually be taking rollsteer out of the car. Reason being, as the right side drops during roll, the bar could possibly be pulling the RR wheel forward as the bar is already lower in front before the chassis starts to roll. As the chassis rolls, it is dropping the chassis mounting point even lower, thus pulling the wheel forward. The amount of rearsteer you need depends on alot of other factors. I hope I didn't confuse you too much. LOL

black95gst
Dirt Roller

Total posts: 15
posted September 19, 2004 08:05 PM  
LOL nope I understood that perfectly. Thanks!

rpm20
Dirt Freak

Total posts: 338
posted September 20, 2004 08:39 PM  
check out thre videos on this site, they speak freakin volumes!!!!

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