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Author Topic:   Milled Head
intimidtr3
Dirt Full Roller

Total posts: 74
posted May 17, 2004 06:18 PM  
I have a 2.3 head milled 120 thousandths do I need to shorten the head bolts?Also,what else do I need to know before I put it on.It has an adjustable gear and is supposed to be set to TDC for stock timing.Never done this and don't want to mess up a 1200 dollar head.

[This message has been edited by intimidtr3 (edited May 17, 2004).]

speedyd1
Dirt Maniac

Total posts: 170
posted May 17, 2004 06:32 PM  
havent had any problems with the bolts themselves. just make sure you run a tap all the way down. make sure you shorten the head locater sleaves. proper cam timing - put crank at TDC - set cam so that both lobes on # 1 cylinder are both facing up equally. use a piece of flat bar about 3" x 5" and lay across the lobes and measure down to the valve cover rails. put your cam sprocket on and attach the timing belt. attach your degree wheel to the crank gear and set your pointer to tdc. place your micrometer on top of your head and set to zero on the #1 intake valve. rotate the crank with a ratchet and 7/8" socket while watching the micrometer. when the cam rotates so that it is at maximum lift, stop and look at your degree wheel. it should read something like 104 - 115 or something. then you can advance or retard using the adjustable cam sprocket to what ever ICL you want. check several times because its not unusual to get slightly different readings due to belt stretch.104 will be stronger off the corners and 112 or higher will be stronger at the end off the straight. hope i didnt forget something.

juliaferrell
Dirt Freak

Total posts: 370
posted May 17, 2004 08:18 PM  
Definitely grind a little off the end of the head bolt and make sure the holes are clean as banny chickens. If your cam is esslinger I would recommend the E-tool method as speedy d1 has mentioned. ***But this is not the method that CRANE or other cams use!!**** Use the degree wheel and dial indicator and dial the thing in. Make sure you have zero lash on number 1 intake and exhaust. MAKE SURE YOU HAVE A GOOD BELT AND SNUG IT UP GOOD> YOUR READINGS WILL VARY ALOT IF YOU DON"T AND YOU WILL BE CONFUSED ON WHERE YOU ARE!! I find true TDC by placing the dial indicator first on the piston. Once you get piston to the highest point put your mark on the balancer in line with something you know won't move!!! Zero the gage and place the indicator on the intake valve and roll the engine over clockwise til you get .050 on the dial indicator, this should be your intake opening point (just retard or advance your cam gear to create this position) Make sure you put you a 3/16 roll pin in your distributor gear!!!! Distributor gear is the first thing that you'll have trouble with if your not use to running a solid or roller or something with some snap. Just go to the parts store get you a 3/16 roll pin and take old one out, drill hole and install new one. If a solid roller I would recommend the oil restrictor for the head to limit upper end oiling. Just a few things I learned over the years. Hope this helps. I like 4-6 degrees advance on all esslinger stuff if on 1/4 3/8 dirt. solids or solid rollers. Make sure you put some silicon in that front cam gear bolt hole. They will leak oil if you don't. I'm with speedyd1 on cutting the headgasket alignment dowels down. That's about all that I can think of. Let us know who she sounds.

b4racing
Dirt Forum Champ
Total posts: 626
posted May 17, 2004 10:14 PM  
as long as your intake and exhaust lobes are the same the ebar method WILL Work every time! Now if they are different you will have to do the other way.

racerman707
Dirt Freak

Total posts: 374
posted May 19, 2004 07:10 AM  
Make sure to check for piston to valve clearance.

racerman707
Dirt Freak

Total posts: 374
posted May 19, 2004 07:24 AM  
ps I use washers under the bolts on mine. You can also shave the head down to 160-170 thousandths no problem to get more compression.

b4racing
Dirt Forum Champ
Total posts: 626
posted May 19, 2004 09:57 AM  
also I like to use head studs so you have more clamping force and they aline the head up so you don't have to worry about having those dowels. Bobby

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