Visit The Dirt Forum for More Information

Author Topic:   Mustang Front Suspension
fastfrank
Dirt Roller

Total posts: 17
posted March 22, 2003 06:51 PM  
Is anyone out there an expert on Mustang front ends? MacPherson Struts?

Any help would be greatly appreciated!!

Frank

joeracer95
Dirt Roller

Total posts: 15
posted April 08, 2003 10:44 AM  
if you can be a little more specific,may be able to help
Mark-MAD racing chassis

4cylinder.net
Dirt Roller

Total posts: 10
posted April 12, 2003 05:39 PM  
A McPhereson strut suspensions should be treated just like a SLA (dual A-arm) suspension with an infinitely long upper arm. This means a few things. The big thing is that wheels will gain positive camber as they go through roll. The next thing is that if your tire contact patch is not aligned with your king pin there will be a bending moment in the strut, which will cause unnecessary friction and not allow the strut to work properly.

If you would like to find your front roll center, instead of using your upper a-arm for a line you use a line perpendicular to your strut passing through the center of your strut upper mounting point.

Sound expert enough? If you have any more questions, just ask.

[This message has been edited by 4cylinder.net (edited April 12, 2003).]

notn
Dirt Full Roller

Total posts: 26
posted April 13, 2003 11:23 PM  
Hey 4cylinder.net.was reading the mail on this one as we run a 83 mustang, could you explain a little about the statement you made "The next thing is that if your tire contact patch is not aligned with your king pin there will be a bending moment in the strut, which will cause unnecessary friction and not allow the strut to work properly." more presise the part about the tire patch aligned with kingpin. I think I I see what your getting at but being new at this I would appreciate more info.
thanks notn
B 1 R #77
less than a month to green flag....

4cylinder.net
Dirt Roller

Total posts: 10
posted April 16, 2003 01:55 PM  
Sorry, I took so long to respond. The answer to your question isn't a simple one. The point at the tire you want to use is the point of the average of all the forces between the ground and the tire. This is very hard to determine, because it depends on the tires design. A fair estimate would be to use the geometric center of the contact patch between the ground and tire.

I was messing around with these numbers a little and when I did them the force was not eliminated, but minimized. It is still a large force, which shows a large weakness in this type of suspension. The best reference I have found for this sort of thing is Race Car Vehicle Dynamics (Milliken & Milliken). It isn't cheap, but well worth it if you truly want to know what is going on with an automobile. Plus the anecdotes are very interesting.

Back to the Archives