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Author Topic:   Pro Topline Heads FORDS????
Dirt-Tracker
Dirt Maniac

Total posts: 182
posted November 13, 2005 07:15 PM  
I ve heard that the Pro Topline heads make more power out of the box than Dart heads with port and polish work done in the Chevy model. Is this true? I also noticed that Pro Topline has Ford heads that they say flow better than any other after market head available. Is this true?

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outlawstock17
Dirt Forum Champ
Total posts: 1366
posted November 13, 2005 07:41 PM  
if you're limited to an iron head, i feel that the ford racing n-351/352 head is still the best.

Normal Sullivan
Dirt Full Roller

Total posts: 43
posted November 13, 2005 08:57 PM  
I don't have any experience with the Pro Topline ford heads. I know the Ford "N" heads work well, and I've had some success with World Products Roush 180 heads on a 302/347. There's a whole lot more to it than dry flow numbers.

outlawstock17
Dirt Forum Champ
Total posts: 1366
posted November 14, 2005 10:26 AM  
agreed. a lot of guys like to see big flow numbers on their heads. dry flow doesn't take into account how efficient the heads are....how well they keep the mixture together/velocity....how succeptable to detonation they are, etc., etc...

brabbit75
Dirt Full Roller

Total posts: 36
posted November 14, 2005 11:23 AM  
I have to run stock heads, no aftermarkets, I have stock 69 windsor heads, i was wondering if they are pretty good, for a pretty much stock windsor, flat top hypers, mild crane cam, 2 barrel, 9.5 :1 compression ratio max.

Normal Sullivan
Dirt Full Roller

Total posts: 43
posted November 14, 2005 11:15 PM  
Using stock ford heads I'd try to find a pair of DOOE-C Windsor heads '69-74. If that's what you have, good deal. These have 58cc combustion chambers and the standard tiny windsor ports. The 75-82 heads all have huge chambers, making it difficult to get good compression with flat top pistons.

What can you get away with on port work, valve sizes, etc? None of these "salvage yard" heads provide exceptional flow as cast, and unlike some makes, there's no magical factory head that works far better than the other.
When running stock iron it's very important to get as much out of your valve job (back-cutting valves, etc.) as possible, and also to make a good choice on your camshaft. A spit-duration cam will be necessary to make the most of factory windsor heads.

[This message has been edited by Normal Sullivan (edited November 14, 2005).]

[This message has been edited by Normal Sullivan (edited November 14, 2005).]

brabbit75
Dirt Full Roller

Total posts: 36
posted November 15, 2005 01:29 PM  
Rules say no porting of heads or manifolds, intake or exhaust, but can get away with a little i suppose, don't say anything about valve sizes, but I did put the stainless steel valves in it, that are the stock sizes(not sure of the sizes, but I think that they are 2.02/1.84s) not certain, and for the cam here is the cam card for it. http://www.cranecams.com/index.php?show=browseParts&action=partSpec&partNumbe r=130092&lvl=2&prt=5 . Let me know what you think. Thanks a bunch

[This message has been edited by brabbit75 (edited November 15, 2005).]

Normal Sullivan
Dirt Full Roller

Total posts: 43
posted November 15, 2005 11:25 PM  
I take it you've already bought your camshaft. Not a bad grind, by any means, but here are a couple of other options: http://www.compcams.com/Technical/Search/CamDetails.asp?PartNumber=31-418-3 or: http://www.holley.com/data/Products/Technical/61003.pdf These are dual pattern cams that use profile and duration to make the most of Fords weak exhaust port design. All the same, if you use the Crane single-pattern cam, make sure your machine shop makes the inner cut on the valve pockets deep enough to clean up the bowl transition area. (notice I didn't say "porting" so it's legal ) & it would be worthwhile to gasket match the exhaust as well, but that would be cheating if you got caught. I wouldn't do much/anything on the intake side, with that cam exhaust flow or valve float will limit your rpm before intake becomes an issue. Good luck to you.

outlawstock17
Dirt Forum Champ
Total posts: 1366
posted November 16, 2005 05:55 AM  
install chevrolet 1.94" and 1.60 valves, smooth the area where the cutter from the valve grind transitions into the bowl area, like normal said. also, remove the thermactor bosses from the exhaust ports. you can do this without changing the port shape. most tech guys will never notice this. they still won't flow as well as a stock chevrolet casting...

if you're not limited to a hydraulic cam, then by all means use a solid. i've used the old ford C7FE(lemans) cam with a lot of success. it's not available anymore but there are some close copies out there...

brabbit75
Dirt Full Roller

Total posts: 36
posted November 17, 2005 09:24 AM  
Yeah I did get my cam already, I ran it last year in a road hog(2 drivers) won many features with it, I'm just hoping its enough because this year I'm moving up to bombers with it, using same motor and all. Rules do say that can only run hydraulic cam, so solid is pretty much out of the question. I'm not too worried about the valve float, I'm trying to get desired RPMs around 5800 -6000,and that says 6200 for float,plus from what I've been told, don't wanna run them too much more than that. I just gotta make sure its under 9.5 CR, and balance bottom end, and I think I'll be ready. Any other suggestions? I run a 1/4 mile medium bank track..Thanks

[This message has been edited by brabbit75 (edited November 17, 2005).]

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