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Author Topic:   383 Crank Help
DIRTDOG311
Dirt Full Roller

Total posts: 36
posted April 18, 2005 07:25 PM  
Does anyone have pics of where and how to clearance a 350 four-bolt main block for a 383 crank? I have never done this and don't want to destroy the block.

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jpotter94
Dirt Forum Racer

Total posts: 94
posted April 18, 2005 11:00 PM  
i dont know of any pics however i have done many..most of the ones i build have h-beam rods and it requires a little more grinding then stk rods..what i do is install each piston and rod,rotate the crank both ways and mark it,then grind those spots out,reinstall each one to make sure you took off enough material..mine in my late model right now had to be ground up into the cylinder quit a bit so we had to rehone each cylinder after grinding all of them too..i would also recomend running a small base circle camshaft to hep with rod to cam clearance..these are very good motors to run,but takes alot of work to get the right..hope this helps!

racer2
Dirt Freak

Total posts: 352
posted April 19, 2005 06:01 AM  
id use I beam rods, too much grinding with h beams

MOD 4s
Dirt Roller

Total posts: 17
posted April 19, 2005 05:07 PM  

 
this is with h beam rods

rickbraley
Dirt Full Roller

Total posts: 58
posted April 20, 2005 01:09 PM  
While clearancing my 350 block for a 3.75" crank my machine shop found the remaining block thickness to be less than desired. They are planning on using some material I believe they referred to as "block set" to fill in the lower water jacket. Anyone ever heard of this? Is this acceptable? Just looking for a second opinion on this approach...

Any insights will be appreciated!

krace72
Dirt Roller

Total posts: 16
posted April 23, 2005 05:29 PM  
Block fill is mostly used in drag race applications where cooling is not an issue when you run a 1/4 mile at a time.It can take away from the amount of cooling capability because it is a concrete sustance that you fill your block usually when a 350-400 chevrolet block has been bored to .080 to keep the cylinder walls from flexing.I would be careful of how much is put in because if done right the whole block is filled almost to holes for the water pump.I guess it depends on how good your cooling system is.

dirt_mopar99
Dirt Forum Racer

Total posts: 94
posted April 26, 2005 05:56 AM  
I'm not a chev man but, the best stroker or any Chev setup I've seen for durability and track performance is the 377 I believe it's a 400 block w/ 350 crank. Revs like crazy!

Ego Racing
Dirt Forum Champ
Total posts: 724
posted April 26, 2005 01:25 PM  
quote:
Originally posted by krace72:
Block fill is mostly used in drag race applications where cooling is not an issue when you run a 1/4 mile at a time.It can take away from the amount of cooling capability because it is a concrete sustance that you fill your block usually when a 350-400 chevrolet block has been bored to .080 to keep the cylinder walls from flexing.I would be careful of how much is put in because if done right the whole block is filled almost to holes for the water pump.I guess it depends on how good your cooling system is.

We have been running hard block for 16 years in oval track motors with a short fill (up to the water pump holes). No problems. We run an aluminum rad, 24lb cap, bleed out all of the air and 1-2 bottles of water additive.
These have been Gas and Alcky motors from 628ci-260ci and have had no problems. Mix it correctly and let it harden so it dosen't come loose and end up somewhere else. The heat in a motor is in the combustion chamber and heads not the bottom of the cylinder. As long as you have good waterflow and cooling around the tops of the cylinders you will be fine.
If they fill the block to shallow it may crack and come loose. Also one on the benifits we have seen is the bearings on the crankshaft look better after a season in a filled motor, as the fill reduces block flex.

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