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Author Topic:   OIL ANALYSIS GO OR NO GO
fastrack1
Dirt Maniac

Total posts: 145
posted February 13, 2003 06:44 PM  
NEED SOME INPUT FROM THOSE THAT HAVE DONE THIS HAD A SAMPLE DONE I KNOW WHICH ONES TO LOOK AT BUT WHAT ARE THE TROUBLE LINES TO LOOK AT ON WHETHER IT IS OK OR NEEDS LOOKING INTO THE OIL ANALYSIS TOLD ME TO RUN IT BUT AS A RACER I NEED SOME REINFORCEMENT FROM RACERS THAT KNOW THIS STUFF HERE IT IS IRON 318 LEAD 413 COPPER 21 ALUM 31 IS THERE TROUBLE CLOSE BY THIS IS A SUPER STREET ENGINE TURNING 7000 -7100 MAX ENGINE HAS 15 RACES ROUGHLY ABOUT 750 LAPS ENGINE WAS COMPLETLY REMACHINED TO BEGIN WITH

Gene
Dirt Freak

Total posts: 396
posted February 14, 2003 05:37 PM  
I had an oil sponsor(D-A)that did a few samples for me. Its neat if you have all the time it takes to figure out where the problem samples are comming from. ie
Iron = piston rings, usually valve guides, yours shows what you'd expect racing stock used heads, lead = you have wore the bearings out, copper= bearing problem getting bad someplace,
aluminum =darn good pistons but the cast iron rings are wore.
My guess is that your engine is fair except if it is a sample of break-in oil. New oil after a rebuild will give real scary readings, but you dont have enough aluminum to have a fresh engine. If it were me, I'd find the bad bearing while rebuilding the engine.

sideways
Dirt Forum Champ
Total posts: 715
posted February 15, 2003 08:32 PM  
Heres the deal.Oil samples are good deal but you have to send in a couple at the same intervals and same "run" time to establish wear"trends".The engine oil needs to be warm and mixed up.Let the streem of oil run out for a little bit(quart or so)then take the sample.This will result in the best possible oil sample.I use oil sample on all the semis every time I change oil.To establish "trends".I have had 8 years experience with them have yet to use one on a race engine but may start.Where are you getting your sample bottles from? hope this helps.

fastrack1
Dirt Maniac

Total posts: 145
posted February 15, 2003 08:57 PM  
I PURCHASED IT AT A LOCAL DETRIOT DIESEL DIST I WORK AT DONE BY CTC IN ATLANTA GA TO TELL WHAT I HAVE DONE NOW IS I LET THE OIL DRAIN FOR 2 DAYS SO IT ALL WOULD GO THEN TOOK A CLOTH CAREFULLY WITH STIFF WIRE AND USED IT TO SWAP THE INSIDE BOTTOM OF THE PAN DID NOT FIND ANY UNSIGHTFUL METAL THEN CUT THE FILTER FOUND SOME PAINT SPECKS WHERE I KNOW THAT CAME FROM AND OF COURSE THE GREAT BLUE SILICONE BUT I DID SEE NOT SEE METAL OUT OF THE ORIDINARY AND BY THE WAY I DID CATCH THE OIL AFTER ABOUT THE TIME I CRACKED OPEN THE PLUG MAYBE A 1/2 PINT RUN OUT WHICH I SUPPOSE WAS NOT A GOOD THING TO DO

[This message has been edited by fastrack1 (edited February 15, 2003).]

James Ott
Dirt Maniac

Total posts: 131
posted September 25, 2005 05:44 PM  
I hope this will be of some help to you guys wanting to do oil samples. Take the oil sample from a hot motor. The oil should be drawn off from the oil pressure line. Do not do it from the pan. Do not draw it from the dip stick tube. A bad sample will give you bad analysis results. You can remove your tubing to your gage and lose an ounce or so then take your sample. Just cranking the starter will give you enough oil pressure to get this done.

James Ott
Dirt Maniac

Total posts: 131
posted September 25, 2005 05:46 PM  
Here are some elements that might show up on your results and what they mean:
Aluminum (Al): Thrust washers, bearings and pistons are made of this metal. High readings can be from piston skirt scuffing, excessive ring groove wear, broken thrust washers, etc.
Boron, Magnesium, Calcium, Barium, Phosphorous, and Zinc: These metals are normally from the lubricating oil additive package. They involve detergents, dispersants, extreme-pressure additives, etc.
Chromium (CR): Normally associated with piston rings. High levels can be caused by dirt coming through the air intake or broken rings.
Copper (CU), Tin: These metals are normally from bearings or bushings and valve guides. Oil coolers also can contribute to copper readings along with some oil additives. In a new engine these results will normally be high during break-in, but will decline in a few hundred hours.
Iron (Fe): This can come from many places in the engine such as liners, camshafts, crankshaft, valve train, timing gears, etc.
Lead (Pb): Use of regular gasoline will cause very high test results. Also associated with bearing wear, but fuel source (leaded gasoline) and sampling contamination (use of galvanized containers for sampling) are critical in interpreting this metal.
Silicon (Si): High readings generally indicate dirt or fine sand contamination from a leaking air intake system. This would act as an abrasive, causing excessive wear. Silicon is also used as a anti-foam agent in some oils. more on silicon
Sodium (Na): High readings of this metal normally are associated with a coolant leak, but can be from an oil additive package

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