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Author Topic:   wheel offset question
glen73
Dirt Roller

Total posts: 25
posted December 09, 2002 11:07 PM
i run factory stocks in Oklahoma,i run all 3 off aero wheels,iv never really understood wheel offsets,i see some guy with the rf wheel out there,please give me some general info,thanks for the feedback

outlawstock17
Dirt Forum Champ
Total posts: 620
posted December 10, 2002 06:52 AM
hey glen, it's wes.....general rule is the farther outboard the wheel is the less weight is on that wheel. ex. a 2" offset wheel will have less weight on it that a 4" offset one.

RangeRover
Dirt Maniac

Total posts: 174
posted December 10, 2002 08:23 AM
That's right, but the more dominant affect on the car with wheel offsets is the fact that they will change a car's handling characteristics by moving the alignment relationship of the rear drive wheels and the front steering or tracking wheels. When the guy at your track puts a 2" backspacing on the RF it sticks out and you might think that the car will loosen up because he took weight off that corner and thus dropped X percentage. That may not be so simple, because putting the RF further away from the center of the car is like moving the rear end leftward, to a degree. You know that will tighten the car up noticably. You could do the same by putting a 2" backspace wheel on the LR and/or a 4" backspacing on the RR to bring it in closer to the center of the car. Most of the time, the change in handling from the position change of the wheel with respect to the car and the other wheels' positions has a much more pronounced effect on handling than the corner weight changes that resulted from the change in offset. Ideally, your weights should be close throughout the car, but playing with wheel offset is an effective way of tuning the car's handling. For example, the track is going away fast in the heats because it wasn't watered enough or there are alot of cars on it tonight. You foresee a dry slick feature, so from the heat's set up you can swap that sticking out 2" backspace RR that helped the car turn in the sticky track with a 4" backspace RR that will be pinned down harder by the car in the turn and it will promote grip on the slick track while other guys are tip-toeing through the corners.

c21
Dirt Freak

Total posts: 346
posted December 10, 2002 11:16 AM
awesome explanation Range Rover.

The only thing I could add is all things considered, sticking the LR out on a drier track would be my recommendation (as apposed to sticking out the RF or sucking in the RR).
Probably a personal preference thing, but I've always felt that most all of the changes that need to me made to adapt to the ever changing track can be done with the LR. A good selection of tires for the LR with a few different sizes for manipulating cross/rear stagger and ... a couple of offset choices (to manipulate rear track centerline relative to the front) can take care of most surface requirements (along with pressure changes). Some folks don't have as many offset options for the RR due to interference with leafsprings, etc and ... in classes that allow a RR beadlock only, it gets expensive to keep on hand a lot of different RR's (and spares for each tire/wheel combo)when running beadlocks.

The RF change works fine ..... but I only bring 8 or 9 spares when I go racing (a space issue)and bringing 2 spares for each offset choice I might make on the RF leaves little room for other spares.

just my $.02,

c21

[This message has been edited by c21 (edited December 10, 2002).]

glen73
Dirt Roller

Total posts: 25
posted December 11, 2002 10:59 PM
thanks for the info,you guys explained so i could understand it,iv had folks tell me at the track,and i wonder if they really know what they are talking about!

c21
Dirt Freak

Total posts: 346
posted December 12, 2002 10:51 AM
quote:
Originally posted by glen73:
thanks for the info,you guys explained so i could understand it,iv had folks tell me at the track,and i wonder if they really know what they are talking about!

a lot of racers know a quite a bit (or know how to make their car work), but don't necessarily understand what they know (the basic priniples involved) making info they pass along often confusing and sometimes incorrect for your particular situation.

we're all still learning,
c21

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