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Author Topic:   Floater
blanep
Dirt Full Roller

Total posts: 66
posted February 14, 2002 11:09 PM
Ok, stupid question time. What is a floater rear end and how is it different from a non-floater? I always kinda assumed a floater was just referring to the way the rear end was connected to the frame, but am beginning to think that maybe I was wrong. Is there something internally that makes a floater different from a non-floater? Thanks in advance.

awkwardjeff
Dirt Freak

Total posts: 458
posted February 15, 2002 02:56 AM
a floater rear end is when the axles float side to side......the axle is splined on both ends......a floater has a seperate drive flange that uses tapered bearings on the hub and is held on the axle tube with a nut in the center.

a non-floater rear is where the drive flange and drive axle are all one unit....like most stock rear ends.......this is held into the housing with a roller bearing with a bearing plate and 4 nuts and bolts......this doesn't allow the axle to slide side to side.

What makes the floater rear end safer is the fact that when you break a axle the wheel and hub stay attached to the housing, not allowing the wheel to become seperated from the car. A non-floater normally breaks the axle outside the bearing plate letting the wheel seperate from the car......more often than not entering the corner at it's highest load ..........normally resulting in the driver testing the safety of the roll cage.

WesternAuto17
Dirt Freak

Total posts: 248
posted February 15, 2002 09:32 AM
With relative affordable price of a floater, why are the illegal in most street stock classes? Once you do all the work and spend all the money on building a stock type 9", its not that much more to buy a floater set-up. It bugs me b/c its definately a lot safer and I have no desire to "test" my roll cage. Just my 2 cents.

o5racer
Dirt Maniac

Total posts: 115
posted February 15, 2002 10:13 PM
Actually its called a floater because it is a full floating axle housing. its the exact same design as you will find on just about any 3/4 ton and 1 ton pickup. the hub rides directly on the housing, and the only load on the axle is from the engine.

blanep
Dirt Full Roller

Total posts: 66
posted February 16, 2002 09:13 PM
Thanks for setting me straight. Now for my follow-up... from past experience, about how much offset in the rearend is the limit for metric cars. What I am getting at is I have stumbled across a 9" rear that has 3" of offset (or whatever is the correct term) and was needing to find out if this is too much of a kink to throw into the driveline (engine is in stock location).

awkwardjeff
Dirt Freak

Total posts: 458
posted February 16, 2002 11:44 PM
blanep, If you have 3 off wheels on the right front and right rear I like to see the right side tires in line with each other..
On the left side I want to see the left rear farther away from the chassis then the left front.......I like the left rear to stick out 2 inches, as compare to the left front..

I like to see the pinion in line with the tail shaft of the tranny......NO MORE THAN A INCH OR SO OFF LINE............

other people may have other views.....this is what I like........Jeff

blanep
Dirt Full Roller

Total posts: 66
posted February 17, 2002 12:57 AM
The last part of your response was what I was lookin for, how much the center section of the rear could be offset from the engine and tranny.

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