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Author Topic:   Camber Curve
69-er
Dirt Full Roller

Total posts: 39
posted May 26, 2001 06:53 PM
I don't know why this never occured to me before...

I've always set my camber at a negative value on the right and a positive value on the left based on Steve Smith.

If the ride height is set properly so that the camber change always goes in one direction during bump, why should the right side, for instance, be set at a negative value if the camber change also goes to a negative value? Instead of the tire tread winding up flat on the track, during bump, it seems to me that the tire would only tilt more inward!

I feel that the camber should be set positive so that when the camber goes negative, the tire will be flat on the track during cornering.

What am I missing here?

Larry

FJR0226
Dirt Roller

Total posts: 5
posted June 11, 2001 02:31 PM
quote:
Originally posted by 69-er:
I don't know why this never occured to me before...

I've always set my camber at a negative value on the right and a positive value on the left based on Steve Smith.

If the ride height is set properly so that the camber change always goes in one direction during bump, why should the right side, for instance, be set at a negative value if the camber change also goes to a negative value? Instead of the tire tread winding up flat on the track, during bump, it seems to me that the tire would only tilt more inward!

I feel that the camber should be set positive so that when the camber goes negative, the tire will be flat on the track during cornering.

What am I missing here?

Larry



When u enter the turn, the wheels are turned to the left. But after the car is set u turn to the right.Most people set the camber for the exit, meaning the tire actually rides on the edge on exit. Most people dont realize how much a tire sitting flat on the track will kill the turn speed.

covalence
Dirt Newbie

Total posts: 1
posted June 13, 2001 02:48 PM
69-er,

The piece of the puzzle that's missing is the body roll and it's direct affect on camber. As the body rolls, the mounts rotate somewhat in relation to the tire patch and the upper ball joint moves significantly. That has the effect of pushing a negative cambered RF toward positive camber. The tough part is figuring out where it should be initially to balance everything out at the center of the corner or so. It's the opposite on the left, but there's a significant difference. The right side naturally gains negative camber (as you point out) as it is compressed while the left looses some of its positive camber. That all ignores the body roll, though. You're trying to get enough 'built-in camber to offset the effect of body roll.

I think that there is an article you can find on the Circle track magazine website (where I discovered most of this). Good luck with it -

BW

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