Visit The Dirt Forum for More Information

Author Topic:   Interesting web site
loojack
Dirt Maniac

Total posts: 133
posted August 06, 2002 04:19 PM
Last night I found a great web site, try www.rattlesnakeraceway.com. Look at the menu on the left and scroll down to Bomber Construction Guide- interesting

notchman
Dirt Roller

Total posts: 18
posted August 11, 2002 05:52 PM
That was an AWESOME site. Tanx for sharing that, man. it sure opened my eyes about what it's gonna take...WWWWOOOOOOWWWW!!!!! Maybe every Newby should read that!

------------------
Don't forget, go fast,,,,turn left!!!!!!

loojack
Dirt Maniac

Total posts: 133
posted August 12, 2002 04:02 PM
You're welcome, Notch-Did you check out the carb rule?... Everybody runs a Rochester Quad with the secondaries disconnected.

------------------
Middle aged wannabe racer!

loojack
Dirt Maniac

Total posts: 133
posted August 12, 2002 04:05 PM
You're welcome Notchman, Did you check out the carb. rule? A Rochester quadrajet with the secondaries disconnected. Some good info about wiring and other stuff!

------------------
Middle aged wannabe racer!

o5racer
Dirt Maniac

Total posts: 115
posted August 12, 2002 09:49 PM
How do you go anywhere like that? I had the secondarys stick shut in a heat race once. I had plenty of time to watch the tach because it wouldnt turn over 4200RPM.

Deek
Dirt Full Roller

Total posts: 45
posted August 13, 2002 03:30 PM
Actually, it works pretty good. When my wife raced the class she routinely turned about 5500-6000 with the secondaries shut off.

It's a lot cheaper than making everyone run two barrels and then watching them go out and spend 500-600 bucks for a trick piece.

I wrote the guide. Thanks for the good comments.

KPLugnut
Dirt Freak

Total posts: 408
posted August 14, 2002 08:21 AM
Yep, NOW what is happening, is the top runners in classes like that are spending $500-$600 to get their quadrajets worked over so that they make power again without needing the secondaries to open.....

It's a never-ending battle, boys....rules like that solve nothing other than to cause racers to spend even MORE money buildnig motors all over again (new cams, special carb work, and all sorts of R&D costs)....

KPLugnut

Deek
Dirt Full Roller

Total posts: 45
posted August 14, 2002 03:54 PM
So, if I was to take your logic one step further, why should there be any rules at all? For example, why run a two barrel class when the racers are spending as much as many late model racers would on a 4 barrel? Why limit cubic inches when the racer will spend thousands more to have that 355 run reliable and fast at 8000 rpm? Why run cast iron intakes when someone can go to Brezenski and get a stock looking manifold that costs $$$$ and flows much better?

Rules protect racers from themselves. I wont argue that you could spend the money and try to make a gray-area-work-around for any rule in exsistance. The question is, how effective would the high dollar fix be?


This rule works for this track in our little part of the country. It's obscure and certainly not mainstream. It can be beat, like any other rule. But, in practice, it has worked for us and we have tried it different ways in the past.

I've been the tech guy, the promoter, and the racer...All in one night. And one thing I do know is that rules must be straight forward, clear, and easy to enforce. Anything that takes over 5 minutes on the tech pad doens't work. I've read time and again on message boards how racers are upset that track officials don't tech well enough or at all. This rule works well enough, is easy to enforce, and is a good deterrent. It isn't for every track and every racer, but that's okay, too. As long as I've got a bunch of cars fighting it out together for the checkered flag instead of spread way apart I know it's helping at least a little.


6pack
Dirt Maniac

Total posts: 128
posted August 14, 2002 09:28 PM
So true, Deek. I've seen several classes of cars price themselves out of existence over the years.

KPLugnut
Dirt Freak

Total posts: 408
posted August 15, 2002 07:50 AM
Firstly, Deek, I understand completely your viewpoint and honestly do see things from your point of view. I too, have been a chief tech inspector, head flagger, AND track promotor and PR person ALL at the same time at a local dirt track, as well as both fielding one car there and building about 9 engines for other competitors in one season.
Now, most of you will think "conflict of interest" immediately there, but if you know me well enough, you will strike that thought.
I ain't like that...:-).
I too, have seen things work well with respect to efficiently written and policed rules. I have also seen more than my share of the proverbial "bracket creep" where continually, racers push the envelope and over the course of a season at a time, suddenly the entry level class at a track evolves into an intermediate level, then the track writes in a new "entry level" class that starts out named something like "pure stock", then gets named "pure street" then before long it's called "street stock", etc etc etc...
All I was basically trying to say in my above comment (because carbs is what I do)was that JUST forcing racers to run a quadrajet that is only running off the primaries seems like a quick and easy answer to the tech issues (and it is), but in the real world and in the long run, it does not really save racers any money. I meant nothing more than that, and on all your points you made, I do agree.

Carry on, everyone...

Kinetic Performance

Eljojo
Dirt Freak

Total posts: 273
posted August 18, 2002 12:53 PM
Well I went over there and read the topic and have to say that it is by far and large the one most informative, broad based, piece ever I've read about entry level racing. I too have been one of those racers who has put his desire to go faster ahead of the common sense guidelines laid out by the track.
Entry level classes are exactly that -entry level. To me that means that a person is hoping to "enter" into the sport of stock car racing. Our local track is a VERY fast 4/10ths (Volunteer Speedway in Bulls Gap Tn,) ans last season they started an entry level class. They called it hobby stock and told the boys to play by the rules (what few there were) and walked away. I watched as guys built 6" rod motors, domed piston motors, installed button clutches, bolted on every power making part they could find. Guys dropped from open wheel cars,sportsman, and even limited late divisions to race the hobby class. Now as the end of the season draws near someone pops up and says that the class is out of hand!
Guys will find a way to run up front-no mater what! I believe that entry level cars should be piloted by rookies. I think they ought to have low compression motors and small valve heads. I think they ought to have claim rules on not just the engine, but on the carb and on the distributor. I think the rules as writtne by Rattlesnake only missed on two major points-1. the suspension should be optional> that way a novice learns to set up a car (racing springs,stock mount shocks, and shims or lowering blocks) and 2. lock up those rears Let the boys get the feel of a racecar-don't throw them into such a sharp learning curve when they move up.
Get some guy who's running off with the show and have tech find out what he's got. Let him sit out a couple of races and loose the points lead he's built--then get him (or her) legal and put him back out on the track.
Y'all have fun! Seeyabye
Eljojo

Back to the Archives